Why Global Handwashing Day Is Important

Handwashing with soap could prevent about 1 out of every 3 episodes of diarrheal illnesses and almost 1 out of 6 episodes of respiratory infection like pneumonia. Handwashing is a simple and inexpensive method of effectively removing germs from your hands. Global Handwashing Day is celebrated annually on October 15 worldwide.

What is Global Handwashing Day?

Starting in 2008, “Global Handwashing Day is a way to support a global and local culture of handwashing with soap, shine a spotlight on the state of handwashing in each country, and raise awareness about the benefits of handwashing with soap.” Founded by the Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing with Soap, Global Handwashing Day encourages school children, teachers, and families to get involved.

Did You Know?

There are 1,500 bacteria living on each square centimeter of your skin right now. Our hands spread germs; people frequently touch their eyes, nose, and mouth without even realizing it – spreading germs that can make us sick.

“Handwashing with soap is one of the cheapest, most effective ‘vaccines’ against viral diseases, from the seasonal flu, to the common cold,” said Sanjay Wijesekera, head of UNICEF’s global water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programmes.

Are You Washing Your Hands Long Enough?

Take a look at our helpful video on proper handwashing to learn more.

Most people do not wash their hands long enough. It is recommended that you wash your hands for a minimum of 20 seconds to properly remove germs.

Handwashing Saves Lives

“Although people around the world clean their hands with water, very few use soap to wash their hands. Washing hands with soap removes germs much more effectively.”

  • Millions of children under the age of 5 years die from diarrheal diseases and pneumonia, the top two killers of young children around the world.
  • Handwashing with soap could prevent about 1 out of every 3 episodes of diarrheal illnesses and almost 1 out of 6 episodes of respiratory infection like pneumonia.
  • 2.2 Million children die per year from diseases often prevented by proper hygiene

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “Handwashing is not only simple and inexpensive, but remarkably, handwashing with soap can dramatically cut the number of young children who get sick.”

How Can You Participate?

There are a variety of ways that you can participate in Global Handwashing Day including:

  • Make sure you and your family know when and how to properly wash your hands.
  • Visit Facebook and Twitter to learn more about Global Handwashing Day games and activities.
  • Download handwashing resources from: //globalhandwashing.org/ghw-day/tools
  • Get social by searching for and using the hashtag #iwashmyhands on Twitter, Facebook, and other social media platforms.

Remember that properly washing your hands (for at least 20 seconds) is a simple and effective method of preventing the spread of germs that should be practiced daily. For more information on handwashing, visit the CDC’s handwashing website.

Why Medical Training Models Are Essential For Medical Students

Medical training models are common for teaching medical students certain medical applications and procedures. Anatomical models and simulators will help guide students in learning the process of a procedure, while increasing their comfort level with the application. Medical training models not only provide the student with hands-on practice, it gives the student a visual to apply real life situations instead of reading about it via books and slides.

We have a variety of models and simulators to choose from, such as CPR simulators, medical patient simulators, IV training models, real baby care dolls, and more! Our I.V. Injection Arm Model is unique in that it allows a realistic training to teach competence to medical staff. This model is also great for group instructors because of its high quality, stain resistance and easy to clean material. Many instructors use this model for the following training:

  • Intravenous injections
  • Correct puncture of peripheral veins for blood sampling. The following veins can be punctured: basilic vein, cephalic vein, median cubital vein, dorsal venous rete of hand
  • Positioning of a venous catheter

Another popular medical training model is our Basic Billy Basic Life Support Simulator. This simulator is used to teach students CPR techniques focusing on the depth and force of compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiac failure is one of the leading causes of death and with this medical training model, it shows how easy it is to provide help and save lives through correct CPR techniques.

Are you currently using any medical training models in your facility?

Coming Soon…New Anatomical Models!

We’re excited to announce that we’re adding new products to our anatomical model category!

These new anatomical models are excellent tools for learning and understanding human anatomy (most commonly used for medical students and explaining procedures to patients). This new addition will include skeleton models, simulators, skin models, heart models, eye and ear models, and more! These models are manufactured from 3B Scientific and Denoyer-Geppert and will be live on our website mid-April.

Have any questions about our latest product addition? Leave a comment in the box below!

Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) Are More Common Than You May Think

Did you know approximately 1 out of every 20 patients who are admitted into the hospital will pick up a hospital-acquired infection during their stay? You probably know someone who has acquired an infection while staying in the hospital, but might not realize how common it is. A majority of the time, these hospital-acquired infections (HAI) are often preventable.

Hospital acquired infections typically occur to a patient 2-3 days after being admitted into the hospital. HAI often require patients to stay longer in the hospital, which also includes a longer recovery time. With a longer stay and recovery time, the cost of being in a hospital increases.

Who is more vulnerable to acquire hospital infections?

  • Young children (usually newborn babies or sick children)
  • Elderly people
  • People with existing medical conditions (for example, diabetes)
  • People who have diseases that compromise their immune system or those in chemotherapy treatments or being treated with steroids.

Most common types of hospital acquired infections

  • Pneumonia (lung infection)
  • Wound infections
  • Urinary tract infection (UTI)
  • Bloodstream infection

What are other risk factors associated with an HAI?

  • Long stay at the hospital can increase your risk for contracting a hospital infection.
  • Not properly washing your hands by hospital staff and patients.
  • The length or type of operation or surgical procedure.
  • Medical equipment that isn’t properly used or sterilized can introduce possible infection into a patient.
  • Any wound or surgical incision are inclined to infections.

How to reduce your risk of an HAI?

  • Before going to the hospital, stop smoking, keep a healthy weight, let your doctor know of any existing illnesses and manage your diabetes appropriately.
  • During your stay, make sure to wash hands properly.
  • During your stay, let your nurse know of any unclean or contaminated items in your room.
  • Ask family and friends not to visit you if they are not feeling well.

Some people are more susceptible to hospital infections compared to others. It’s important to bring awareness to hospital acquired infections, since they have become more and more common.

It’s Multiple Sclerosis Month, 5 Things To Know About MS

March is Multiple Sclerosis month, which gives awareness to a chronic, often disabling disease that attacks a person’s central nervous system (brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves). It’s important for people to understand what multiple sclerosis (MS) is and how this disease can impact a person’s life.

  1. MS symptoms can range from mild to severe, since MS is unpredictable and often varies from person to person. Symptoms may include numbness to the limbs, or for more severe symptoms paralysis or loss of vision.
  2. Today, there have been great advances in MS research and new treatment options that provide hope to those with this disease.
  3. While it’s not proven that MS is hereditary, having a relative such as parent or sibling with MS can increase a person’s risk for developing the disease.
  4. Maintaining good health is crucial for people with MS. This includes proper nutrition, exercise, emotional health, etc.
  5. There are many ways to support MS research and awareness. A few examples are joining an MS event (walk, bike, fundraising), becoming an MS activist, and staying informed.

In an effort to spread knowledge of multiple sclerosis, we hope you share this information. For more information, be sure to visit National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

7 Nutrition Tips In Honor Of National Nutrition Month!

March 2014 is National Nutrition Month! This is a national nutrition campaign sponsored by the American Dietetic Association (ADA) with a theme of “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right.”

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “National Nutrition Month is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.” This campaign is a great reminder of how you can create tasty yet nutritious meals to follow the dietary guidelines. What steps are you taking to participate in National Nutrition Month?

Here are a few nutrition tips in honor of National Nutrition Month:

  1. Eat more fruits and vegetables.
  2. Incorporate your meals with salad as a main dish or side salad.
  3. Eat a healthy breakfast.
  4. Eat less salt.
  5. Eat at least 3 meals per day and plan your meals ahead of time.
  6. Watch portion sizes to manage your calorie intake.
  7. Drink more water.

Have a question or comment about this blog post, leave a comment in the box below!

February: American Heart Month

With February almost at a close, we didn’t want to forget about American Heart Month! February is nationally recognized as American Heart Month, a perfect time to learn about keeping a healthy heart! We have listed a few important facts for American Heart Month:

  1. According to the CDC, the number 1 killer of women and men in the United States is cardiovascular disease. This includes heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure.
  2. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) costs the U.S. over $300 billion each year! (This includes cost of medical services, medications and lost productivity)
  3. Most heart attacks are discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. The feeling has been described at uncomfortable squeezing, pressure, fullness or pain.
  4. A few CVD prevention tips: monitor your blood pressure, have your cholesterol checked, have routine physicals from your doctor, eat healthy, maintain a healthy weight, incorporate exercise part of your routine, do not smoke, avoid drinking too much alcohol, ,manage diabetes, take prescribed medication.

Keeping a healthy heart is very important, for more information about American Heart Month and tips visit the American Heart Association: www.heart.org

Just In Time For The New Year – 2014 Year Labels!

Looking to start 2014 off with an organized office or department? We have a variety of 2014 year labels that will help maintain organization and efficiency in your medical office.

The 2014 year labels – PMA fluorescent pink are a laminated, permanent adhesive that comes in a roll of 500.

With professional 2014 year labels, your medical facility can maintain organization with patient documents, medical records, calendar appointments, etc. A few key features these year labels offer:

  • Vibrant color options
  • Permanent adhesives
  • Easy to read/identify

It’s very important that your facility’s year labels are available to use so you can accurately label important information. Do you have your 2014 year labels yet?

Weekly Wrap For December 2 – December 6, 2013

Proper Handwashing Techniques & Tips

Proper handwashing is one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to other people. The first full week in December is National Handwashing Awareness Week. To help celebrate and help raise awareness of the importance of handwashing we will share some helpful tips and techniques to stay healthy. What is the right way to wash your hands? 

Benchmark Scientific – Mortexer Vortex Mixer With Multi-Head

This week [December 2, 2013 through December 6, 2013] we are offering a special Buy One, Get One Free“ promotion on our Mortexer™ Vortex Mixer with Multi-Head™ from Benchmark Scientific. When you buy one Mortexer™ Vortex Mixer [BV1005] at the regular price you will receive your second one free. The free unit will automatically be added to your cart with purchase.

What Are The Parts Of A Lead Eyeglass Frame?

Why are lead eyeglasses important? The risk for radiation induced eye injuries are particularly high for health professionals such as interventional cardiologists, interventional radiologists, doctors using fluoroscopy in operating theaters and paramedical personnel who remain close to the patient during the procedure.

Whiteboard Wednesday: What You Should Do After Using PPE Supplies

Today on Whiteboard Wednesday we discuss proper ways to dispose your PPE (personal protection equipment) supplies after use. Properly disposing your PPE supplies in your medical facility is very important for reducing the spread of infection. Be sure to watch our Whiteboard Wednesday video below!

The Different Types of Ultrasound Scans

There are several different types of ultrasound scans depending on the part of the body being examined. There are external, internal and endoscopic ultrasound scans. An external ultrasound involves the use of a an ultrasonic sensor also known as a transducer or transceiver which is placed on the patients skin and is moved over the body part being examined. An ultrasound gel is applied to the skin to improve the movement of the transducer and ensure continuous contact between the skin and the transducer. 

Proper Handwashing Techniques & Tips

 Proper handwashing is one of the most important steps we can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to other people. The first full week in December is National Handwashing Awareness Week. To help celebrate and help raise awareness of the importance of handwashing, we will share some helpful tips and techniques to stay healthy.

What is the right way to wash your hands?

There are five steps you should remember when washing your hands to ensure that you wash your hands properly. The first step is to wet your hands with clean, running water and apply soap. After applying the soap you want to rub your hands together and make a lather and scrub them well, make sure you scrub the backs of your hands, between your fingers and under your nails. Make sure you continue this process for at least 20 seconds, you can count or hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice. Rinse your hands under running water. The final step is to dry your hands by using a clean towel or air dryer. If you follow these steps you will decrease the chance of getting yourself sick or spreading germs to other people.

The Five Steps to Washing Your Hands

  1. Wet your hands with clean, running water (hot or cold) and apply soap.
  2. Rub your hands together to make a lather and scrub them well; be sure to scrub the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  3. Continue rubbing your hands for at least 20 seconds, hum the “Happy Birthday” song twice.
  4. Rinse your hands well under running water.
  5. Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

When should you wash your hands? 

  • Before, during, and after eating preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • Before and after caring for someone who is sick
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound
  • After using the toilet
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal or animal waste
  • After handling pet food or pet treats
  • After touching garbage

When possible it is best to use soap and water. Although there are times that soap and water are not available, in those cases it is recommended to use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with a minimum of 60% alcohol. Sanitizers will reduce the amount of germs in some situations, but they do not eliminate all types of germs. When using a hand sanitizer you want to apply the product to the palm of one hand and rub your hands together like you would with soap and continue until your hands are completely dry.

Remember the five steps the next time you go to wash your hands to help reduce the spread of infection and illness. Clean hands can stop germs from spreading from one person to another and throughout an entire community. We have made a quick video filled with handwashing tips for you to watch and share with your friends, family and colleagues.