Launching Today: The New Universal Medical Online Store

It’s Launch Day

Are you ready for liftoff?

Today is the big day. We’ve been working hard to bring you a mobile-friendly site that is faster, easier to navigate and more user-friendly. And that day is finally here.

How do I prepare for launch?

To begin using our newly designed site, you’ll need to reset your current account password. The example below shows you what the password reset page will look like. Once you have navigated to the “Forgot Your Password” page, you can enter your email address in the “Email Address” box and press submit.

Watch Our Screencast

We’ve recorded a screencast to help walk you through the password reset process. Click on the image below to watch the screencast.

 

Password-Reset-Screen

 

Resetting Your Password Is Easy

To reset your password, simply click on the orange “Reset My Password” button below and enter your existing account email address in the box of the example “Forgot Your Password” page shown above.

 

Have you visited our new site yet?

Over the past several months, we’ve been working hard to bring you a mobile-friendly site that is faster, easier to navigate and more user-friendly. We can all agree that technology moves fast. And to keep up, we’ve redesigned the site from the ground up with a clean and modern design that provides you with an optimal viewing experience across a wide range of devices. We want you to enjoy your shopping experience across all your devices (from desktop monitors to mobile phones and tablets).

Why not take a look?

We couldn’t be more excited about our newly redesigned site and how it will make shopping faster, easier, and more enjoyable for our customers. Visit www.universalmedicalinc.com or simply click on the screenshot below to see our new eCommerce site for yourself.

 

New-Site-Screen

 

Do You Have Any Questions?

We’re here to help. You can call, email or live chat with us during our normal business hours (M-F 9AM to 5PM EST) with any questions, issues or comments.

The New Universal Medical eCommerce Site Is Coming Soon

We’re excited to announce that in the coming weeks, we’ll be launching our newly redesigned Universal Medical online store, revamping familiar features and introducing new ones. In this post, we’ll share some of the details of the new UniversalMedicalInc.com and how it will improve your overall shopping experience.

So what’s new?

A Cleaner, Bolder, And More Modern Design

Over the past several months, we’ve been working hard to bring you a mobile-friendly site that is faster, easier to navigate and more user-friendly. We can all agree that technology moves fast. And to keep up, we’ve redesigned the site from the ground up with a clean and modern design that provides you with an optimal viewing experience across a wide range of devices. We want you to enjoy your shopping experience across all your devices (from desktop monitors to mobile phones and tablets).

What should I expect?

A Faster and Easier Site to Navigate

If you’ve been a customer of ours for a while, you’ll immediately notice the new design of our Homepage. We’ve revamped our Homepage by making it simpler and easier for you to navigate. With the newly designed site, you’ll be able to find the products you’ve been searching for quickly and easily. Additionally, we’ve enhanced the site search functionality to quickly provide you with relevant products related to your initial search query.

Richer Visuals

Redesigned Logo

One of the first changes you’ll probably notice is the updated Universal Medical logo. We’ve kept the core elements of our logo and made a few minor tweaks to the typography to reflect the clean and modern design of our new site.

Improved Site Search

Another improvement we are really excited about is the search bar. You’ll immediately notice the new location of the search bar, previously, the smaller search bar was located in the upper right corner, now the larger search bar takes center stage, making it much more accessible. Additionally, you’ll no longer have to click away from the Homepage to see the search results. And last but certainly not least, the search results have become visual. Immediately after you start typing, products will begin to display on the search bar drop-down menu – no more clicking away from the Homepage to see your search results – making it faster and easier to find what you’re looking for on our site.

Stay Tuned for Even More Features to Come

There are many more features that we didn’t discuss in this post, as we approach launch day we’ll be rolling out more information. We couldn’t be more excited about our newly redesigned site and how it will make shopping faster, easier, and more enjoyable for our customers. Keep an eye on your inbox for our pre-launch and launch day notification emails. We look forward to having you check out the New Universal Medical eCommerce site.

6 Ways To Prevent Repetitive Strain Injury In The Lab

What is RSI?

RSI is an acronym for repetitive strain injury which occurs when the same physical movements are repeated over an extended period of time. A repetitive strain injury is an injury to a part of the body that is caused by overusing or straining that body part. “Strain occurs when the body part is called on to work harder, stretch farther, impact more directly or otherwise function at a greater level than prepared for¹.”

RSIs can do damage to tendons, nerves, muscles, and other soft body tissues. Repetitive strain injury generally results from using the body for a task that it is either not designed to perform or capable of comfortably working. Although (RSI) is frequently associated with computer users, it can also affect those who work in the laboratory.

Have you ever experienced aches and pains after a long session of pipetting? Have  you ever experienced numbness, tingling, or a burning sensation in your arms and forearms? If you answered yes, to either or both of those questions, you may be experiencing symptoms of repetitive strain injury. Worn pipettes and poor pipetting techniques are two primary factors that contribute to laboratory RSI.

Repetitive Strain Injury In The Laboratory

Did you know that pipetting in the laboratory is one of the most repetitive tasks in the lab? 

Pipetting is commonplace in the laboratory, so, it is not too hard to believe that hand pain due to pipetting is also a common problem in the lab. Although RSI is frequently associated with computer operators, laboratory technicians have reported hand and shoulder ailments while using modern plunger-operated pipettes.

Hand And Shoulder Ailments Among Laboratory Technicians Using Modern Plunger-Operated Pipettes.

In a 1994 study conducted in Sweden, 128 female laboratory technicians employed by university research laboratories working with plunger-operated pipettes were compared to 25,378 female Swedish state employees in general. “The prevalence of hand ailments among the laboratory assistants was found to be twice that among female state employees in general.” The study also found that pipetting for more than 300 hours per year contributed to an increased risk of hand and shoulder ailments.

A questionnaire survey of the ergonomic problems associated with pipettes and their usage with specific reference to work-related upper limb disorders.

A study conducted in 1997 in the United Kingdom, which comprised of 80 pipette users and 85 non-pipette users (control population) determined that the reported occurrence of elbow and hand complaints were significantly higher for the pipette users. “There is an increase in the percentage of those reporting hand complaints as the duration of the working period involving continuous use of pipettes increases.” An astounding 90% of pipette users who exceeded 60 minutes of continuous operation reported hand complaints.

Symptoms Of RSI

Although they may vary, symptoms generally include pain, fatigue, tingling, clumsiness, coldness, and numbness in the arms, legs, neck, upper and lower back. For example, computer users may experience pain in their arms after extended periods of typing. Some computer users who switch from doing a majority of typing on their desktop to a laptop may experience pain shortly after the switch. Symptoms will develop gradually and will continue to worsen over time if left untreated. For lab technicians using pipettes, symptoms mainly occur in the shoulders, arms, and hands.

Look for these warning signs:

  • Muscle discomfort
  • Aches and pains
  • Coldness
  • Muscle tension
  • Tingling and numbness

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Causes Of RSI

Although there a number of factors that can cause RSI, performing repetitive tasks such as pipetting, where the hand and arm muscles are held tight and tense for extended periods of time, can lead to the development of RSI. As muscles and tendons become overused they may be strained beyond their capacity.

Listed below are factors that can lead to RSIs:

  • Repetitive movement (e.g. pipette plunger)
  • Awkward postures
  • Prolonged muscle tension (e.g. holding pipette)
  • Forceful holding or movement (e.g. liquid transfer from one receptacle to another)
  • Poor ergonomics
  • Poor work practices (e.g. improper pipetting technique)
  • Stress (e.g. cluttered lab)

Identifying the root cause is essential to properly treating RSI. Left untreated symptoms will gradually worsen and could ultimately impact your bench science career.
6 Tips To Prevent RSI In The Lab While Pipetting

Although these tips are geared mainly towards pipetting, they can easily be applied to other repetitive tasks that you perform throughout the course of a normal day in your lab.

1) Relax

Stay relaxed physically and mentally while pipetting. As discussed earlier, stress, prolonged muscle tension, and poor ergonomics are all contributing factors to developing repetitive strain injury. Avoid awkward positions while pipetting and make sure to follow proper pipetting techniques.

2) Maintain Good Posture

Regardless of the activity, typing a report on your computer or pipetting, you want to ensure that you are sitting properly and maintain good posture (your back will thank you). Your spine is strong and stable when you practice healthy posture. Slouching makes it difficult for your muscles and ligaments to keep you balanced and can lead to back pain, headaches, and other problems. Avoid dangling your feet, hunching your shoulders, or contort your neck when pipetting liquids.

3) Ergonomics

Ensure that your chair or stool is appropriate for the task. Most chairs offer multiple adjustment options to elevate or lower you to the specific height required for the task. Remember that poor ergonomics and poor posture can lead you to developing RSI.

4) Use A Timer

The longer the repetitive activity, the greater the chance of developing an injury. Incorporating a lab timer into your work process will ensure that you provide yourself with the necessary breaks to prevent strain from pipetting, as well as a mental break that will allow you to refocus on the task at hand.

5) Just Say No To Clutter

An organized lab is a happy lab. By organizing your workstation you will reduce clutter, increase lab safety, and improve overall ergonomics. If you organize your workstation properly, you can determine which supplies (pipette tips, buffers, samples) you need on a regular basis and place them accordingly while minimizing awkward postions. I encourage you to check out our post on The 5S Approach To A Lean Lab for more information regarding this topic.

6) Find The Right Pipette

Not all pipettes are created equal. There are many different pipette manufacturers and models available. One major factor to consider when either using your current pipette or selecting a new one is the operational pressure required to operate the pipette. If you have already begun to experience pain while pipetting, you may want to consider a pipette model that requires reduced operating forces. Additionally, you will want to review the weight of the pipette and the ergonomics (finger hook, plunger configuration, tip ejector).Another alternative for those who are already experiencing symptoms of RSI would be to consider an electronic pipette, they may be heavier but require little operating force to aspirate and dispense. After you have selected your pipette or reviewed your existing pipette, make sure that you are using a compatible pipette tip.

Now that we have covered what repetitive strain injury is, the symptoms, how it is caused, and six tips to help you avoid developing repetitive strain injuries while working in your laboratory, you can now be able to get back to pipetting safely.

What To Do If You Think You Have RSI

If you have experienced or develop these symptoms it is recommended that you speak with an occupational health professional at your facility or your physician.

Helpful Video on Pipetting Safety & Ergonomics 

(Video Source: UCLA Environment, Health, & Safety) 

Sources

What Is Repetitive Strain Injury?

Danger: You Might Be Pipetting Yourself Out Of A Job 

Repetitive Strain Injury: The Hidden Lab Hazard

A questionnaire survey of the ergonomic problems associated with pipettes and their usage with specific reference to work-related upper limb disorders.

Hand and shoulder ailments among laboratory technicians using modern plunger-operated pipettes.

Additional Resources

Laboratory Work With Automatic Pipettes: A Study On How Pipetting Affects The Thumb

3 Advantages Of Disposable Skin Markers In Mammography

Is your medical facility performing mammograms?

If so, are you using disposable skin markers during these exams?

Disposable skin markers are a must-have for mammography. Markers are placed over a nipple, mole, scar, area of concern or other features that could be confused with a lesion. When performing screening mammograms, skin markers can save time, improve accuracy, enhance communication and provide a better experience for the patient.

Low-Dose X-Ray System

A mammogram is an X-ray image of the breast. Mammography is a specific type of imaging that uses a low-dose X-ray system that emits ionizing radiation to create images of the breast, allowing the radiologist, a physician specially trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations, to analyze the images and send a signed report to the primary care or referring physician, who will then discuss the results with the patient.

Reduce Repeat Examinations

Skin markers are an important tool in mammography. Costly repeat examinations can be reduced dramatically by clearly identifying the nipple with a lead ball nipple marker. For example, the Suremark Lead Ball Nipple Marker Label is one of our most popular marker labels for general use purposes. The Suremark label is ideal for distinguishing between a nipple shadow and a lesion.

Easily Locate Raised Moles

Suremark Mole Markers are uniquely designed to locate raised moles and other skin nevi with overshadowing microcalcifications. The radiolucent ring, when placed around a protuberance, prevents flattening due to compression. The mole markers are available with two reference points or three reference points. Ideal for mediolateral oblique view or MLO exams as well as dense breast tissue, these radiolucent mole markers will not burnout.

Improve Patient Comfort

Mammograms are uncomfortable enough for patients with the painful removal of nipple markers. Keeping patient comfort in mind, the Suremark Relief Tabs feature a unique adhesive-free center that won’t stick to sensitive areas of the skin. By using disposable skin markers, exam results will be more accurate and the overall patient experience will be improved.

Not familiar with the Suremark brand? Why not try a sample and compare them to your existing skin markers?

 

 

 

How Do I Select The Right Laser Eye Protection?

LASER stands for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers emit a narrow beam of light and that beam of light is emitted in short bursts and focuses precisely on the desired target. The energy emitted by the laser can be absorbed, scattered, transmitted or reflected. When used in medical procedures, lasers transmit most of their energy to the intended target and that is why proper laser eye protection is so important.

The Eye is Vulnerable to Laser Radiation

The human eye is extremely vulnerable to laser radiation. When working with medium to high-powered laser systems, it is vital to wear the correct laser eye protection for the specified laser type. Unprotected exposure to lasers can result in the development of cataracts or even a corneal burn, which can ultimately result in vision loss. By selecting and wearing the appropriate pair of laser safety glasses, medical personnel can keep their eyes protected from applications and procedures that require a laser system. Protective laser safety glasses must be matched in terms of wavelength frequency and the type of laser being used (e.g., YAG laser glasses, Holmium laser glasses) for your specific application. That is why it is important to understand the consequences of laser radiation exposure.

3 Ways Lasers Can Damage Your Eyes

There are three ways that lasers can damage your eyes including thermal, photochemical, and mechanical damage. Laser safety glasses provide valuable laser eye protection by shielding vulnerable eye tissue from the high-intensity radiation emitted. Laser safety glasses are not only a vital safety component, they are also required in all facilities where medical, surgical, cosmetic or dental laser procedures are performed. Laser safety glasses are also used in research and forensic laboratories.

What Types of Eye Protection are Available?

There are several levels of laser eye protection available. Laser safety glasses are measured in optical density and this number reflects the ability of the filter to block the light that is transmitted at a particular wavelength. The higher the optical density, the more light from the wavelength is blocked. For example, laser safety glasses with an optical density of seven will block all but 0.00001% of the laser frequency.

How Do I Select the Right Laser Eye Protection?

Selecting the right laser eye protection may seem overwhelming; we have simplified the selection process for you by creating a white paper that discusses the eight key factors you’ll want to consider when selecting the right laser eye protection. It is extremely important to protect your eyes and yourself from the harmful effects of laser radiation. Remember, the damage done to your eyes from laser radiation exposure can be permanent. If you have any additional questions regarding how to select the right laser eye protection please comment below or email us at info@universalmedicalinc.com.

 

 

//universalmedicalinc.wistia.com/medias/7w4vgr7ohi?embedType=seo&videoWidth=360

 

 

Why Global Handwashing Day Is Important

Handwashing with soap could prevent about 1 out of every 3 episodes of diarrheal illnesses and almost 1 out of 6 episodes of respiratory infection like pneumonia. Handwashing is a simple and inexpensive method of effectively removing germs from your hands. Global Handwashing Day is celebrated annually on October 15 worldwide.

What is Global Handwashing Day?

Starting in 2008, “Global Handwashing Day is a way to support a global and local culture of handwashing with soap, shine a spotlight on the state of handwashing in each country, and raise awareness about the benefits of handwashing with soap.” Founded by the Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing with Soap, Global Handwashing Day encourages school children, teachers, and families to get involved.

Did You Know?

There are 1,500 bacteria living on each square centimeter of your skin right now. Our hands spread germs; people frequently touch their eyes, nose, and mouth without even realizing it – spreading germs that can make us sick.

“Handwashing with soap is one of the cheapest, most effective ‘vaccines’ against viral diseases, from the seasonal flu, to the common cold,” said Sanjay Wijesekera, head of UNICEF’s global water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programmes.

Are You Washing Your Hands Long Enough?

Take a look at our helpful video on proper handwashing to learn more.

Most people do not wash their hands long enough. It is recommended that you wash your hands for a minimum of 20 seconds to properly remove germs.

Handwashing Saves Lives

“Although people around the world clean their hands with water, very few use soap to wash their hands. Washing hands with soap removes germs much more effectively.”

  • Millions of children under the age of 5 years die from diarrheal diseases and pneumonia, the top two killers of young children around the world.
  • Handwashing with soap could prevent about 1 out of every 3 episodes of diarrheal illnesses and almost 1 out of 6 episodes of respiratory infection like pneumonia.
  • 2.2 Million children die per year from diseases often prevented by proper hygiene

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “Handwashing is not only simple and inexpensive, but remarkably, handwashing with soap can dramatically cut the number of young children who get sick.”

How Can You Participate?

There are a variety of ways that you can participate in Global Handwashing Day including:

  • Make sure you and your family know when and how to properly wash your hands.
  • Visit Facebook and Twitter to learn more about Global Handwashing Day games and activities.
  • Download handwashing resources from: //globalhandwashing.org/ghw-day/tools
  • Get social by searching for and using the hashtag #iwashmyhands on Twitter, Facebook, and other social media platforms.

Remember that properly washing your hands (for at least 20 seconds) is a simple and effective method of preventing the spread of germs that should be practiced daily. For more information on handwashing, visit the CDC’s handwashing website.

Avoiding Retained Surgical Items In The OR

Avoiding Serious Reportable Events (“Never Events”) In The OR

Retained Surgical Items (RSI) are included in the National Quality Forum’s list of Serious Reportable Events (commonly referred to as “Never Events”) as a, “foreign object unintentionally retained after surgery.” The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will no longer pay the extra cost of treating the following categories of conditions that occur while the patient is in the hospital. (Section 5001(c) of the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) of 2005).

  • pressure ulcer stages III and IV;
  • falls and trauma;
  • surgical site infection after bariatric surgery for obesity, certain orthopedic procedures, and bypass surgery (mediastinitis)
  • vascular-catheter associated infection;
  • administration of incompatible blood;
  • air embolism; and
  • foreign object unintentionally retained after surgery 

The National Quality Forum (NQF) defines Never Events as errors in medical care that are of concern to both the public and health care professionals and providers, clearly identifiable and measurable (and thus feasible to include in a reporting system), and of a nature such that the risk of occurrence is significantly influenced by the policies and procedures if the health care organization.

Nothing Left Behind: A National Surgical Patient-Safety Project To Prevent Retained Surgical Items

The site www.nothingleftbehind.org is an educational resource that was started in October 2004 to work with multiple healthcare stakeholder to make sure Retained Surgical Items (RSI) become a true “never” event. The categorical classification of “foreign object unintentionally retained after surgery” may include swallowed pennies, pins, shrapnel, bullets and other objects while surgical items are the tools and materials that we use in procedures to heal not to harm¹.

Patient Safety Problem 

“More than a dozen times a day, doctors sew up patients with sponges and other supplies mistakenly left inside. The mistake can cost some victims their lives².” Although there is no federal reporting requirement, research studies and government data suggests that there are between 4,500 and 6,000 retained surgical items left in patients every year in the United States. “That’s up to twice government estimates, which run closer to 3,000 cases, and sponges account for more than two-thirds of all incidents².”

Simple Solution? 

According to Atul Gawande, a Harvard public health professor and surgeon at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, “It’s a recurrent, persistent and nearly totally avoidable problem…There are technologies that reduce the risk, that actually reduce the overall cost (to hospitals and insurer), and yet they are not the standard. That, to me, is the shocking thing.”

Sponge-Tracking Technology

Research shows that sponges account for 67% of all surgical items mistakenly left in patients². Data complied by Medicare estimates the cost of hospitalizations involving a lost sponge or instrument at more than $60,000 per case, according to USA Today.

Why have so few hospitals adopted systems to prevent lost sponge incidences?

A USA Today survey of companies that manufacture the sponge-tracking technology found that fewer than 15% of U.S. hospitals use sponges equipped with tracking devices, which reduce the risk of leaving a sponge in a patient, that add an additional cost $8 to $12 per surgery.

Barcodes and X-Rays at U-M

Surgeons at the University of Michigan Health System created a system to prevent retained surgical items. “In its effort to be the safest hospital in the country, the U-M uses new technology to insure no objects are left behind in surgery³.” According to Ella Kazerooni, M.D., M.S., professor of radiology at the U-M and associate chair of clinical affairs at the U-M Health System, “Having a foreign object left behind during surgery is something we consider a ‘never event’. It’s something that should never happen³.”

Methods Put Into Practice

  • Bar-coded sponges – sponges have been bar-coded so that they can be scanned when they are used and again when they are taken out of the body. Computers assist the medical staff in counting and if there is a count discrepancy they will know to search the surgical field. (Bar-coded sponges also contain a radiopaque tag)
  • Electronic radiology orders – X-rays are used to find retained items while the patient is still in the OR.

“RSIs can be discovered hours to years after the initial operation and a second operation may be required for removal¹.” According to Dr.Gibbs, author of the Nothing Left Behind site (educational resource), “New ways of thinking about human error and OR practices and understanding systemic changes in OR culture are required to prevent this event. System fixes require knowledge and information, a winning strategy, consistent multi-stakeholder engagement and leadership¹.”

Preventing Future Problems

According to the Institute of Medicine, “the problem is not bad people; the problem is that the system needs to be made safer.” Some hospitals have required four counts of sponges and instruments to improve the system and reduce the number or accidents; while careful counting could prevent some mistakes, counting carries its own risks. Human error can play a major role in RSI incidences, as a majority of the cases of RSI occur under a reported correct count.

Takeaways

  • Bar coding technology can be used to improve counting and tracking sponges in the OR
  • Bar coded sponge management systems are cost-effective
  • Sponge tracking systems are part of a growing trend in which bar coding is utilized to improve the management of medical supplies, equipment and tools throughout the hospital

 

Resources: 

1. Nothing Left Behind: A National Surgical Patient Safety Project To Prevent Retained Surgical Items

//www.nothingleftbehind.org/

2. Eisler, Peter. “What Surgeons Leave behind Costs Some Patients Dearly.”USA Today. Gannett, 08 Mar. 2013. Web. 10 Sept. 2014.

//www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/03/08/surgery-sponges-lost-supplies-patients-fatal-risk/1969603/

3. “University of Michigan Health System Creates System to Prevent Retained Surgical Items.” Web log post. University of Michigan. N.p., 06 Feb. 2012. Web. 10 Sept. 2014.

//www.uofmhealth.org/news/retained-surgical-items-0206

Discover Gucci Radiation Resistant Glasses

Are you fashion savvy?

Have you been searching for a fashionable way to protect your eyes from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation?

Then look no further.

Gucci radiation resistant glasses have arrived. Gucci, a name synonymous with high-fashion and stylish sophistication is the latest addition to our radiation protection eyewear line.

Gucci’s styles for women range from the lightweight nylon frames of the Gucci GG 3547/S, to the bold, full-rimmed frame of the Gucci GG 3574/S.

For men, available styles include the classic Gucci GG1000/S full-rimmed acetate frame and the GG 1856/S ultra-sleek wrap frame.

Radiation resistant glasses never looked so good.

Women’s Radiation Resistant Glasses

Gucci GG 3547/S

The Gucci GG 3547/S (shown above) frames are made of lightweight, durable blended nylon for added comfort and flexibility. Unlike the brittle nylon eyeglass frames of the late 1940s, blended nylon frames are more resistant to breakage and are inherently stronger than their predecessor. Consequently, blended nylon frames are ideal for those looking for a high-quality, durable, and resilient frame.

The round shape of these frames subtly draws attention to the eyes and are well-suited for those with diamond-shaped faces. The ‘simultaneous contrast’ of the red and green temples, juxtaposing complementary colors, creates a stunning visual effect. The decorative, high-set temples are emblazoned with the iconic Gucci label (white lettering) on a bold red background. For those who have been seeking a distinctive and sophisticated pair of radiation resistant glasses, your journey finally may be nearing its end.

 

Gucci GG 3574/S

The epitome of Italian luxury, the Gucci GG 3574/S rectangular frame is bold and distinctive. The hypoallergenic black optyl frame is specially coated to resist sweat and cosmetics. These Gucci radiation resistant glasses seamlessly blend fashion, elegance, and sophistication into an integral piece of personal radiation protective equipment. A trendy frame for those who are unwilling to sacrifice style but understand the importance of properly protecting their eyes from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation.

Have you been searching for radiation eye protection that is functional, yet fashionable?

Your search is over.

These Gucci radiation resistant frames are the answer.

Offering the industry standard 0.75mm lead equivalency, the SCHOTT radiation resistant safety glass lenses will protect your eyes from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation.

According to the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency), “Many years or decades could pass before radiation-induced eye lens injuries become apparent. At relatively high exposures of a few Gy* , lens opacities may occur after many years¹.”

Ensure that your eyes are properly protected by wearing the appropriate radiation resistant glasses. In a 2010 study, Comparing Strategies For Operator Eye Protection In The Interventional Radiography Suite, “The use of leaded glasses alone reduced the lens dose rate by a factor of 5 to 10.” Reduce your risk of developing cataracts, while staying fashionable and safe with Gucci radiation resistant glasses.

Sources:

Thornton RH, Dauer LT, Altamirano JP, Alvardo KJ, St Germain J, Solomon SB. (2010) Comparing Strategies For Operator Eye Protection In The Interventional Radiography Suite.

//www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20920841

IAEA | Radiation Protection of Patients (RPOP) Radiation and cataract: Staff protection

//rpop.iaea.org/RPOP/RPoP/Content/InformationFor/HealthProfessionals/6_OtherClinicalSpecialities/radiation-cataract/Radiation-and_cataract.htm

Gray (Unit)

Wiki: //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gray_(unit)

*Gy = Gray, is a derived unit of ionizing radiation dose in the International System of Units (SI). It is a measure of the absorbed dose and is defined and is defined as the absorption of one joule of radiation energy by one kilogram of matter (0.01 Gy is equivalent to 1 rad).

Using Gel Positioners To Prevent Pressure Ulcers

Preventing Pressure Ulcers In The Operating Room

Pressure sore, decubitus ulcer, and pressure ulcer are all terms used interchangeably to describe localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue that usually occur over a bony prominence as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear and/or friction.

What Is A Pressure Ulcer?

The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) defines a pressure ulcer as an area of unrelieved pressure over a defined area, usually over a bony prominence, resulting in ischemia, cell death, and tissue necrosis.

According to a 2009 article, Prevention of Pressure Ulcers in the Surgical Patient, in the AORN Journal; “pressure ulcers (PUs) are a serious health care problem, and it is crucial to assess how patients acquire pressure ulcers after admission to a health care facility. In the OR, factors related to positioning, anesthesia, and the duration of the surgery, in addition to patient-related factors, all can affect PU development¹. . . All surgical patients should be considered at-risk for pressure ulcer development; therefore, preoperative departments should develop and implement strategic plans for pressure ulcer prevention.”

Quick Facts

Did you know?

Number of patients affected by pressure ulcers: 2.5 million per year

Cost

  • Pressure ulcers cost $9.1-$11.6 billion per year in the U.S.
  • Cost of individual patient care ranges from $20,900 to $151,700 per pressure ulcer.
  • Medicare estimated in 2007 that each pressure ulcer added $43,180 in costs to a hospital stay.

Pressure Ulcer Management

In 2008, The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) included hospital acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU’s) as a “Never Event” which marked a turning point for most facilities. “Pressure ulcer management has become a standard part of every modern hospital’s protocol¹.”

Four Major Factors Contributing To Pressure Ulcers¹

  1. Uneven weight distribution
  2. Pressure
  3. Shear
  4. Heat and humidity build up

“Pressure ulcers are a costly, debilitating, and avoidable complication of surgery².”

The National Pressure Advisory Panel (NPUAP) and European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EPUAP) created the Pressure Ulcer Prevention: Quick Reference Guide outlining risk factors for patients in the operating room.

1. The following factors increase the risk the patient developing a pressure ulcer during a surgical procedure include:

a)Length of the operation
b)Increased hypotensive episodes intraoperatively
c)Low core temperature during surgery
d)Reduced mobility on day one of postoperatively
2. Use a pressure-redistributing mattress on the O.R. table for all individuals identified as being at risk of pressure ulcer development.

Action Products manufactures O.R. overlays that are cited by AORN best practices for Pressure Ulcer Prevention. The O.R. overlays, available in standard and custom sizes, provide pressure redistribution and reduce shear effects across the entire table surface. The low profile, simple design of the 1/2 inch Akton poymer O.R. overlay maximizes effectiveness and minimizes patient movement.

3. Position the patient in such a way as to reduce the risk of pressure ulcer development during surgery.

4. Elevate the heels completely (offload them) in such a way as to distribute the weight of the leg along the calf without putting all the pressure on the Achilles tendon.

The heel support gel positioner by Action is designed to secure and protect the heel area as well as cradle the patient’s Achilles tendon area.

5. Pay attention to pressure redistribution prior to and after surgery.

a) Place patient on pressure-distributing mattress prior to and after surgery.
b) Position the patient in a different posture preoperatively and postoperatively than the posture adopted during surgery.

Types of Gel Positioners

Head & Neck Gel Positioners help protect and cradle the patient’s head and neck by stabilizing the head movement and assists in the prevention of neck overextension.

  • Lateral Head Pad with Center Dish
  • Donut Head Pads
  • Prone Headrests
  • Horseshoe Head Pads
  • Contoured Head Pad
  • Ophthalmic Headrests
  • Ophthalmic Cradle Headrests

Extremity Gel Positioners protect the patient’s arms and legs during procedures.

  • Contoured Armboard Pads
  • Armboard Pads
  • Hand/Wrist Support
  • Foot Pad
  • Heel Support
  • Stirrup Pad Set

Torso & Hip Gel Positioners provide support for the torso and upper body by providing increased stability.

  • Flat-Bottomed Chest Rolls
  • Contoured Chest Rolls
  • Chest Gel Positioners
  • Trapezoid Gel Positioner
  • Dome-Shaped Gel Positioner

Proper patient positioning and cushioning of all pressure points is a priority and using the correct padding can protect the patient from pressure ulcers.

“Procedures longer than 2 1/2 hours to 3 hours significantly the risk of pressure ulcer formation. Positioning problems can result in significant injuries and successful lawsuits.” ~Patient Positioning In The Operating Room

AORN recommends “Classifying all surgical patients as “at risk” for PU development is an appropriate preoperative intervention to successfully reduce the incidence of possible PU development.” The uncontrollable length of surgeries and effects of anesthesia are two of the main contributing factors leading to the development of pressure ulcers. Although it is impossible to eliminate the risk of patients developing pressure ulcers during surgical procedures – some patients will develop pressure ulcers from skin breakdown regardless of preventative measures. It is important to be aware of the causes of pressure ulcers and what steps you can take to minimize the risk.

Additional Information:

References:

 

3 Different Types Of Prescription Lead Glasses

For those who wear corrective lenses and need to protect their eyes from radiation, we offer three different prescription lens types for our lead glasses. After reading this post you will understand the different types of prescription lens types that we offer, eyeglass prescription terminology, and what prescription information is needed to properly place your order.

Before placing your order, it is important for you to understand the differences between the various corrective lenses before making your decision. Lead glasses provide you with the necessary eye protection to help reduce your risk of developing cataracts from prolonged exposure to ionizing radiation. In the past, those who wore corrective lenses would often be required to wear bulky radiation safety goggles or fit over lead glasses. However, a number of the lead glasses that we now offer are available with various types of prescription lens.

Prescription lens types:

  • Single vision prescription lenses
  • Lined bifocal prescription lenses
  • Progressive bifocal lenses

Single Vision

Single vision prescription lenses have the same magnification throughout and correct for only one distance. These lenses are designed to correct conditions such as myopia (nearsightedness¹), hyperopia (farsightedness), and astigmatism². Our single vision prescription radiation safety lenses offer the industry standard 0.75mm lead equivalency and are manufactured using SCHOTT SF-6 HT radiation resistant glass.

How do I know if I have a single vision prescription?

To illustrate, an example of a single vision prescription is shown below. While reviewing the sample prescription, you may notice several abbreviations, listed below are common terms found on eyeglass prescriptions. If your prescription doesn’t have any values or abbreviations in the ADD column, you have a single vision prescription.

 Single Vision Prescription Lenses
RxSPHERICALCYLINDRICALAXIS
O.D.-2.00-0.5040
O.S.-1.75
Pupillary Distance65

Prescription Abbreviations & Terminology 

  • OD – Oculus Dexter, from the Latin word dexter meaning “right”, means the right eye.
  • OS – Oculus Sinister, sinister which is derived from the Latin word sinistra meaning “left hand”, means the left eye.
  • SPH – Spherical, is the main strength of the lens prescription, and is written in 0.25 increments. It is also referred to as power and is abbreviated as PWR.
  • CYL – Cylinder, this will only appear on your prescription if you have an astigmatism, and is written in 0.25 increments. It is possible that this will only apply to one eye. If you don’t have an astigmatism, your doctor may leave this field blank, or they may choose to put ‘00’, ‘DS’, SPH’, or ‘Plano’ in this field. If the field has one of those abbreviations you will know that you don’t have an astigmatism correction in one or both eyes.
  • AX – Axis can be abbreviated as AX, or simply X. If the cylinder field is left blank or has any of the following abbreviations including ‘00’, ‘DS’, SPH’, or ‘Plano’, this field will be left blank or have an ‘0’.
  • PD – Pupillary distance or interpupillary distance (IPD) is the distance (industry standard is in millimeters) between your right pupil and left pupil. The PD is usually written in the lower row labeled P.D. on your prescription.

Single-Vision Pupillary Distance

  • Binocular P.D. – 65
  • Monocular P.D. – 30/30.5  (OS/OD)

Bifocal/Progressive Pupillary Distance Binocular

  • Near/Reading P.D. – 62
  • Distance P.D. – 65

The American Optometric Association states that Astigmatism is a vision condition that causes blurred vision due either to the irregular shape of the cornea, the clear front cover of the eye, or in other cases the curvature of the lens inside the eye. Astigmatism is a particularly common vision condition.

Lined Bifocal

Bifocal prescriptions are for patients who have difficulty seeing both far and near. They are commonly prescribed to individuals with presbyopia who also require a correction for myopia, hyperopia, and/or astigmatism. As their name suggests, lined bifocals offer distance correction on the upper portion of the lens, and near vision correction on the bottom portion of the lens. Lined bifocal lenses, provide two distinct optical powers with different focal lengths – one for distant vision and one for near vision. The near vision lens has a semicircle (bottom) that measures 28mm wide and has a flat-top (top). Traditional lined bifocal lenses are separated by a visible line.

Progressive Bifocal

Progressive bifocals, or simply progressive lenses, allow you to experience bifocal vision without the traditional bifocal lines. Progressive lenses provide you with a more natural way of seeing. Presbyopia³ is a common vision condition for those over the age of 40 where the eye has difficulty focusing on near-field objects. Individuals who have worn traditional bifocals in the past may have experienced “image jump”, this occurs when there is an abrupt break from distance to near-field vision. Progressive bifocal lenses provide  you with optimum vision and a seamless progression of lens strength.

How do I know if I have a bifocal prescription?

If you notice that there are numbers in the ADD column of your prescription, you have a bifocal prescription.

 Lined Bifocal/Progressive Bifocal Prescription Lenses
RxSPHERICALCYLINDRICALAXISADD
O.D.-2.00-0.5040+1.75
O.S.-1.75+2.00 PAL
Pupillary Distance65

ADD – ADD is the value commonly used for bifocal or progressive lenses. ADD indicates how much power is added to the distance prescription to create the reading-only prescription. ADD corrections will usually have the same value for both eyes. The abbreviation PAL may appear next to one of the numbers in the ADD field, or it may be written elsewhere on your prescription, this indicates that your doctor determined that you will need a different ADD correction for progressive lenses.

PAL– Progressive additive lens (ADD value specifically for progressive bifocal lenses).

Ordering Information

We hope that this post has provided you with helpful information that you will assist you during your research. To review, we covered the different types of prescription lead glasses that we offer, common terminology and abbreviations found on your prescription, and what prescription information we need to properly place your prescription lead glasses order. When ordering, please fax or email your prescription (Rx) including your pupillary distance (PD). For your convenience, prescription information can also be noted in the “Order Comments/Special Instructions” section under “Payment Information” while checking out.

Please note: Lens enhancements options are not available in combination with prescription lenses. 

Questions? Comments?

If you have any questions regarding the different types of prescription lead glasses that we offer, please feel free to contact us via live chat or simply leave a comment below.

Sources:

American Optometric Association – Eye & Vision Problems