3 Different Types Of Prescription Lead Glasses

For those who wear corrective lenses and need to protect their eyes from radiation, we offer three different prescription lens types for our lead glasses. After reading this post you will understand the different types of prescription lens types that we offer, eyeglass prescription terminology, and what prescription information is needed to properly place your order.

Before placing your order, it is important for you to understand the differences between the various corrective lenses before making your decision. Lead glasses provide you with the necessary eye protection to help reduce your risk of developing cataracts from prolonged exposure to ionizing radiation. In the past, those who wore corrective lenses would often be required to wear bulky radiation safety goggles or fit over lead glasses. However, a number of the lead glasses that we now offer are available with various types of prescription lens.

Prescription lens types:

  • Single vision prescription lenses
  • Lined bifocal prescription lenses
  • Progressive bifocal lenses

Single Vision

Single vision prescription lenses have the same magnification throughout and correct for only one distance. These lenses are designed to correct conditions such as myopia (nearsightedness¹), hyperopia (farsightedness), and astigmatism². Our single vision prescription radiation safety lenses offer the industry standard 0.75mm lead equivalency and are manufactured using SCHOTT SF-6 HT radiation resistant glass.

How do I know if I have a single vision prescription?

To illustrate, an example of a single vision prescription is shown below. While reviewing the sample prescription, you may notice several abbreviations, listed below are common terms found on eyeglass prescriptions. If your prescription doesn’t have any values or abbreviations in the ADD column, you have a single vision prescription.

 Single Vision Prescription Lenses
RxSPHERICALCYLINDRICALAXIS
O.D.-2.00-0.5040
O.S.-1.75
Pupillary Distance65

Prescription Abbreviations & Terminology 

  • OD – Oculus Dexter, from the Latin word dexter meaning “right”, means the right eye.
  • OS – Oculus Sinister, sinister which is derived from the Latin word sinistra meaning “left hand”, means the left eye.
  • SPH – Spherical, is the main strength of the lens prescription, and is written in 0.25 increments. It is also referred to as power and is abbreviated as PWR.
  • CYL – Cylinder, this will only appear on your prescription if you have an astigmatism, and is written in 0.25 increments. It is possible that this will only apply to one eye. If you don’t have an astigmatism, your doctor may leave this field blank, or they may choose to put ‘00’, ‘DS’, SPH’, or ‘Plano’ in this field. If the field has one of those abbreviations you will know that you don’t have an astigmatism correction in one or both eyes.
  • AX – Axis can be abbreviated as AX, or simply X. If the cylinder field is left blank or has any of the following abbreviations including ‘00’, ‘DS’, SPH’, or ‘Plano’, this field will be left blank or have an ‘0’.
  • PD – Pupillary distance or interpupillary distance (IPD) is the distance (industry standard is in millimeters) between your right pupil and left pupil. The PD is usually written in the lower row labeled P.D. on your prescription.

Single-Vision Pupillary Distance

  • Binocular P.D. – 65
  • Monocular P.D. – 30/30.5  (OS/OD)

Bifocal/Progressive Pupillary Distance Binocular

  • Near/Reading P.D. – 62
  • Distance P.D. – 65

The American Optometric Association states that Astigmatism is a vision condition that causes blurred vision due either to the irregular shape of the cornea, the clear front cover of the eye, or in other cases the curvature of the lens inside the eye. Astigmatism is a particularly common vision condition.

Lined Bifocal

Bifocal prescriptions are for patients who have difficulty seeing both far and near. They are commonly prescribed to individuals with presbyopia who also require a correction for myopia, hyperopia, and/or astigmatism. As their name suggests, lined bifocals offer distance correction on the upper portion of the lens, and near vision correction on the bottom portion of the lens. Lined bifocal lenses, provide two distinct optical powers with different focal lengths – one for distant vision and one for near vision. The near vision lens has a semicircle (bottom) that measures 28mm wide and has a flat-top (top). Traditional lined bifocal lenses are separated by a visible line.

Progressive Bifocal

Progressive bifocals, or simply progressive lenses, allow you to experience bifocal vision without the traditional bifocal lines. Progressive lenses provide you with a more natural way of seeing. Presbyopia³ is a common vision condition for those over the age of 40 where the eye has difficulty focusing on near-field objects. Individuals who have worn traditional bifocals in the past may have experienced “image jump”, this occurs when there is an abrupt break from distance to near-field vision. Progressive bifocal lenses provide  you with optimum vision and a seamless progression of lens strength.

How do I know if I have a bifocal prescription?

If you notice that there are numbers in the ADD column of your prescription, you have a bifocal prescription.

 Lined Bifocal/Progressive Bifocal Prescription Lenses
RxSPHERICALCYLINDRICALAXISADD
O.D.-2.00-0.5040+1.75
O.S.-1.75+2.00 PAL
Pupillary Distance65

ADD – ADD is the value commonly used for bifocal or progressive lenses. ADD indicates how much power is added to the distance prescription to create the reading-only prescription. ADD corrections will usually have the same value for both eyes. The abbreviation PAL may appear next to one of the numbers in the ADD field, or it may be written elsewhere on your prescription, this indicates that your doctor determined that you will need a different ADD correction for progressive lenses.

PAL– Progressive additive lens (ADD value specifically for progressive bifocal lenses).

Ordering Information

We hope that this post has provided you with helpful information that you will assist you during your research. To review, we covered the different types of prescription lead glasses that we offer, common terminology and abbreviations found on your prescription, and what prescription information we need to properly place your prescription lead glasses order. When ordering, please fax or email your prescription (Rx) including your pupillary distance (PD). For your convenience, prescription information can also be noted in the “Order Comments/Special Instructions” section under “Payment Information” while checking out.

Please note: Lens enhancements options are not available in combination with prescription lenses. 

Questions? Comments?

If you have any questions regarding the different types of prescription lead glasses that we offer, please feel free to contact us via live chat or simply leave a comment below.

Sources:

American Optometric Association – Eye & Vision Problems

 

How Do I Order Prescription Lead Glasses?

Question: How Do I Order Prescription Lead Glasses?

This is a frequently asked question that we receive from our new and existing customers. This post will walk you through the necessary steps to ensure that your order is processed in a timely manner. It is our goal to make your experience as painless as possible.

We currently offer over 75 different styles of lead glasses available with different types of enhancements. There are three prescription lens types available, including single vision, lined bifocal, and progressive bifocal (progressive lenses). Please note that the availability of Rx lenses will vary by frame type.

Step 1 – Find your pair of lead glasses

Step 2 – Determine prescription type

  • Single vision
  • Lined bifocal
  • Progressive bifocal (no-lines)

Step 3 – Choose Your Lens Style

Please note that options will vary by frame style and manufacturer. Due to the custom nature of prescription lead glasses they cannot be returned.

  • Standard
  • Anti-reflective (not available with prescription lens)
  • Fog free (not available with prescription lens)
  • Single vision Rx
  • Lined Bifocal Rx
  • Progressive bifocal Rx

Pricing adjusts in real-time as you add enhancements to the frames. The single vision, lined bifocal, and progressive bifocal prescription radiation safety lenses all offer the industry standard 0.75mm lead equivalency and are manufactured using SCHOTT SF-6 HT radiation resistant glass.

Step 4 – Choose frame color

Please note that color options will vary by frame style and manufacturer

Step 5 (Optional) – Add frame imprint text

  • Frames will be laser engraved
  • Imprint limit is 35 characters (may vary by model)
  • Engraved glasses are non-returnable

 Step 6 – Select desired quantity and click “add to cart”

Step 7 – Review your order

  • Review your order for accuracy

 

Step 8Proceed to checkout

  • Returning customers can sign in for faster checkout
  • New customers can create a personal account (Benefits of registering: quick checkout on future orders, easy order tracking, and special offers)

Step 9 – Enter billing and shipping information

  • Enter your billing information
  • Enter your shipping information
  • Choose your shipping method (Selecting Next Day or 2nd Day Air will only change the shipping transit time, as prescription lenses are made to order)
  • Enter payment information

Step 10 – Add Prescription Information

Please note that the manufacturer will contact us if they have any additional questions regarding the prescription after their initial review to ensure accuracy.

  • Add prescription information in the “Order Comments/Special Instructions” box
  • Include OD/OS values from prescription
  • Include Pupillary Distance (PD)
  • Prescriptions can be faxed to 1-800-535-6229
  • Prescriptions can be emailed to order@universalmedicalinc.com

Ordering Information

Prescription lead glasses normally take at least two weeks to produce (may vary depending on item availability). If you need prescription lenses before a certain date contact, please customer service for specific information regarding frame availability and production time. As mentioned above, selecting priority shipping will only expedite the transit time of the package. Since the prescription lenses are made for your unique eye prescription, production times will vary. In an upcoming post, we will discuss the different prescription lens types that we offer in more detail. If you’re curious as to how prescription lead glasses are made, you’ll want to make sure and check out our video.

Questions? Comments? 

Not sure what type of frame is right for you? Many of our lead glasses have product demonstration videos to help you find the right style. If you have any additional questions, please feel free to contact us or leave a comment in the box below.

How Do Lead Glasses Protect Your Eyes?

Protecting Your Eyes From Ionizing Radiation Exposure

Lead shielding is an important radiation safety principle. In fact, shielding is one of the three basic radiation safety principles. Time, distance and shielding are the primary means of eliminating or reducing ionizing radiation exposure.

Lead Shielding

Shielding should be used wherever it is necessary to reduce or eliminate radiation exposure. There are a variety of types of lead shielding options, the focus of this article will be on radiation eye protection and the use of lead glasses.

Radiation Attenuation 

Appropriate shielding placed between the source of radiation and the worker, radiation is attenuated and exposure may be completely eliminated or reduced to an acceptable level. Lead acts as a barrier to reduce x-ray’s effect by blocking or bouncing particles through a barrier material. Attenuation is the result of interactions between x-ray and matter that include absorption and scatter. Much like lead aprons which are commonly found in x-ray rooms in hospitals, lead glasses reduce radiation exposure and protect the lens of the eye.

Occupational Radiation Exposure Limits

Exposure limits have been established by the Nuclear Regulatory Committee (NRC) and set to a level where apparent injury due to ionizing radiation during a normal lifetime is unlikely. This limit is called the “maximum permissible exposure” and medical personnel should be aware of their occupational radiation dose. These occupational radiation exposure limits have been established to help minimize the amount of radiation a worker receives annually by monitoring their occupational radiation dose and keeping them under the established limits. “The exposure limit for the whole body (5,000 mrem) is lower than that for a single organ because all organs and tissues are exposed in whole body exposure, while only a single organ is involved in the single organ exposure limits¹.”

Lens of Eye (LDE) Radiation Exposure Limit

The occupational exposure limit for the lens of the eye (LDE) is 15,000 millirem or 0.15 Sieverts. The Lens of Eye Dose Equivalent (LDE) 10 CFR 20.1003 “applies to the external exposure of the lens of the eye and is taken as the dose equivalent at tissue depth of 0.3 centimeter (300 mg/cm²).”

Personal Monitoring 

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requirements regarding personal monitoring devices. Many medical personnel are required to wear an individual monitoring device to measure the dose to the whole body as well as one at an unshielded location closer to the eye to provide an accurate reading of the lens dose equivalent. Wearing lead glasses will help ensure the lenses of the eyes are properly protected from ionizing radiation thereby reducing your risk of developing cataracts.

“Radiation workers who operate x-ray machines, fluoroscopy units, certain unsealed and sealed radioisotopes or are exposed to other sources of gamma or high energy beta radiation are generally required to wear one or more dosimeters².”

Eye Protection: Reducing Tissue Reactions

Tissue reactions, previously referred to as deterministic effects or non-stochastic effects, describe a cause an effect relationship between radiation and some side-effects. There is a threshold dose, once exceeded, the severity of an effect increases with dose. Examples of tissue reactions include skin erythema, which can occur shortly after radiation exposure. Late tissue reactions, particularly those involving the lens of the eye, such as cataracts, can develop long after the initial radiation exposure, but still can be traced back to the original exposure.

Radiation-Associated Cataracts 

Two separate studies published in 2010 reported that interventional cardiology personnel have an increased risk of developing cataracts, a clouding or opacity of the eye that hinders vision. In a recent study, Radiation Cataract Risk In Interventional Cardiology Personnel (October of 2010), Vano et al tested 116 exposed interventional cardiologists, nurses, and technologists for radiation cataracts and compared them to 93 unexposed control personnel. Thirty-eight percent of the cardiologists, with a cumulative median lens dose of 6.0 Sieverts, developed cataracts, compared with 12 percent of the controls. Twenty-one percent of the other medical personnel, who were exposed to a cumulative median lens dose of 1.5 Sieverts, developed radiation-associated lens changes attributed to ionizing radiation exposure.

The second study, Risk For Radiation-Induced Cataract For Staff In Inventional Cardiology: Is there reason for concern? (November 2010)examines the prevalence of radiation-associated lens opacities among interventional cardiologists and nurses and to correlate with background radiation exposure. The results of the study demonstrated a dose dependent increased risk of posterior lens opacities for interventional cardiologists and nurses when radiation protection tools are not used. Although, a study of a larger cohort is needed to confirm these findings, the results suggest ocular radio-protection should be used.

Radiation Eye Protection 

Our eyes are one of our most valuable organs, without properly functioning eyes even the most routine tasks can become extremely difficult to complete. “Eyes are delicate and precious” says Dr. Andrew Lwach, spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. When working near and around ionizing radiation it is important to protect your eyes from potential exposure by wearing lead glasses. Radiation safety glasses, commonly referred to as lead glasses, are designed to protect the lens of the eye by reducing the amount of radiation that is permitted to pass through the leaded glass lenses.

Conclusion 

According to a study, Comparing Strategies For Operator Eye Protection In The Interventional Radiography Suite, published in November of 2010, the “use of leaded glasses alone reduced the lens dose rate by a factor of five to 10.” The operator lens radiation dose rate was recorded with a solid-state dosimeter with nonleaded and leaded (0.75mm lead equivalent) eyeglasses. Lens dose measurements were obtained in right and left 15 degree anterior obliquities with the operator at the upper abdomen and during digital subtraction angiography (two images per second) with the operator at the patient’s groin.

Lead Glasses 

Today, lead glasses come in a wide-variety of styles and configurations including wraparound, goggles, fit over, economy, plastic, metal, and designer frames. For example, metal frames are available with frontal (lens) and lateral radiation(side shields) protection offering 0.75mm and 0.35mm lead (Pb) equivalency respectively.

The industry standard 0.75mm lead equivalency SCHOTT SF6 radiation safety glass lenses provide protection from harmful radiation exposure. The lenses have been tested (CE Certified for Radiation Reducing Eyewear) at 100 kV and have a nominal lead equivalence of 0.75mm Pb and the side shields offer a nominal lead equivalence of 0.35mm Pb at 100 kV. Lead glasses are an essential piece of personal protective equipment that will help reduce the amount of radiation exposure to your eyes.

 

3 Rugged Oakley Radiation Eye Protection Lead Glasses

New Lead Glasses From Oakley

We are excited to announce the addition of a new line of high-quality and durable radiation eye protection lead glasses from Oakley. There are three models available including the classic Oakley Straight Jacket, the Oakley Crankshaft, and the Oakley Fives Squared. These new frames are a welcomed addition to our extensive selection of radiation eye protection and that provides our customers with a stylish and unique answer to traditional radiation eye protection.

 Straight Jacket® Lead Glasses

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The aggressive styling combined with over a decade worth of research has produced the Oakley Straight Jacket radiation glasses. These lightweight and durable stress resistant Straight Jacket frames utilize Oakley’s O-Matter® frame technology and are engineered to provide you with all-day comfort and performance.

Part of the Oakley active line, and available in a variety of colors, these frames offer protection that meets ANSI standards for both high-velocity and high-mass impact.

Designed to fit medium faces, the Straight Jacket frame utilizes soft Unobtanium components to increase grip with perspiration around the nose and ears, ensuring a snug fit.

For those that define style on their terms, the Oakley Straight Jacket Radiation Protection Lead Glasses provide you with unmatched comfort, performance and eye protection from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation.

Crankshaft™ Lead Glasses

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Fusing radiation protection with the inspired smooth styling of the popular Oakley Gascan® and Fuel Cell™ designs comes the ultimate in radiation eye protection, introducing the revolutionary Crankshaft Radiation Glasses.

The lightweight and durable stress-resistant Crankshaft frames, available in a variety of colors, utilize Oakley O-Matter frame technology providing you with all-day comfort and performance.

Part of the Oakley Lifestyle line, these wraparound frames improve side protection and are designed to comfortably fit medium to large faces.

Achieve a new level of performance and style while protecting your eyes from radiation with the innovative Crankshaft Radiation Glasses.

Fives Squared Radiation Protection Lead Glasses

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Faces are not one size fits all, your radiation glasses are no exception. Introducing the Fives Squared Radiation Protection Glasses, specifically designed for small to medium faces, that feel as great as they look.

Constructed of Oakley’s lightweight and durable stress-resistant O-Matter material, this frame is engineered to provide you all-day comfort and performance by utilizing Oakleys unique condensed cranial geometry.

The patented hydrophilic Unobtainum nose pads reduce slipping by increasing grip with perspiration, providing you with a snug and secure fit.

The dimensional reliefs, metal icons and sculpturally integrated hinges with dual action cams, the Fives Squared frame is the perfect blend of sophisticated styling and performance eye protection.

When ordinary radiation protection glasses just don’t fit, look no further, the Fives Squared Radiation Glasses is your answer to comfort and protection.

Lead Glass Lenses 

All three of the frames are outfitted with SCHOTT Radiation Safety Glass Lenses that provide the industry standard 0.75 millimeter lead equivalency and are held securely in place by Oakley’s unique Three-Point Fit technology, ensuring safety and long lasting performance.

Frame Personalization 

You can leave your mark by adding the option of a personalized imprinting of up to 35 characters on the outside of the frame arm and enhance the performance of the lead glass lenses with the optional fog-free or anti-reflective coatings. These customizations and enhancements are available for all three frames.

This is an exciting addition to our radiation eye protection line-up and if you would like to be notified of any future radiation eye protection glasses subscribe to our blog and we will notify you of upcoming product releases.

5 Ways To Minimize Your Occupational Radiation Exposure

Minimizing Occupational Exposure

“The ideal dose is the least amount of radiation possible to produce an acceptable image.”

1. Time

Time is one of the three basic safety measures to reduce external radiation exposure. It is important for healthcare personnel to limit the amount of time spent in close proximity to the radiation source when exposure to the radiation source is possible. Reducing the time of an exposure reduces the effective dose (radiation) proportionally. Consequently, the less time you are around the equipment, the smaller your exposure will be.

2. Notification by Radiation Equipment Operator

Before any treatment or procedure, it is the responsibility of the trained and certified radiation equipment operator to notify healthcare personnel in the x-ray or treatment room prior to the activation of radiation producing equipment (RPE).

Any piece of equipment in which x-rays are produced electrically are classified as radiation producing equipment or RPE. These tools are used in a variety of medical applications including radiography, mammography, computed tomography, and fluoroscopy.

3. Fluoroscopic Procedures

Healthcare personnel performing fluoroscopic procedures must ensure that the patient is kept as close as possible to the image intensifier side of the fluoroscopic unit and away from the tube side of the unit. All healthcare personnel involved in the fluoroscopic procedure must stand on the image intensifier side of the fluoroscopic unit, whenever possible, to reduce the radiation exposure. Standing on the the same side as the image intensifier radiation intensity is decreased.

4. Avoid Direct Beam Exposure

Healthcare personnel assisting with radiological procedures must avoid holding the patient manually during a radiographic study due to the risk of direct beam exposure.  Any individual holding or supporting a person during radiation exposure should wear protective gloves and apron with a minimum of 0.25 millimeters lead equivalent. Under no circumstances should individuals holding or supporting a person’s part of their body be directly in the primary beam. Healthcare personnel must avoid exposing any body parts to direct x-ray beam exposure.

5. Utilize Shielding

Whenever possible, appropriate shielding should be used to provide attenuation of the radiation being delivered to the healthcare personnel who are potentially exposed. Healthcare personnel must keep all body parts out of the direct x-ray beam. There are a variety of shielding options available and may include, but are not limited to:

Specific Shielding Applications

Healthcare personnel who may have to stand with their backs exposed to the radiation beam must wear wrap-around aprons to decrease the risk of radiation exposure.

Bone and Bone Marrow Protection

When healthcare personnel are in close proximity to the radiation beam they should wear an appropriate lead or lead equivalent apron of sufficient length to shield the upper legs and protect the long bones and bone marrow from increased doses of radiation.

Thyroid Protection 

Healthcare personnel must wear a thyroid collar to protect the thyroid whenever the likelihood of the procedure places them at a higher risk of increased exposure.

Female Healthcare Personnel 

Female healthcare personnel must protect their breasts from radiation exposure by utilizing an apron that completely covers the area.

Eye protection

Healthcare personnel must shield the lens of the eye by using leaded eyeglasses with wrap-around side shields or leaded face shields to reduce scatter radiation when it is anticipated that increased fluoroscopic time may be necessary.

Limiting Radiation Exposure 

Reducing radiological exposure in healthcare settings is important for both occupational workers as well as patients. The following guidelines are based on the radiation safety principles of time, distance, and shielding. By following these guidelines, you can reduce your occupational exposure to radiation.

 

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Note: This information included in this post is intended for general reference information only. The information provided is not a substitute for professional advice and should not be relied upon in the absence of such professional advice.

How To Choose The Right X-Ray Apron Style (Part 3)

Which x-ray apron style is right for you?

X-ray aprons are available in a wide variety of styles to meet the specific needs of medical professionals. Determining which lead x-ray apron style is right for you may seem overwhelming. The selection process can be simplified into several easy steps and in this post we will walk you through the necessary steps to ensure that you find the right x-ray apron as well as the appropriate level of radiation protection. The x-ray selection process can be broken down into three steps: (1) choosing your core material, (2) selecting the type of protection required, and (3) determining the best x-ray apron style for your needs.

Core Materials

In our previous post, How-To Determine Which X-Ray Apron Material Is Right For You, we discussed the three different types of core x-ray apron material options including traditional lead, lead composite, and non-lead. Each core material offers a distinct benefit, traditional lead aprons are the most economical, lead composite aprons provide an average weight savings of 25% compared to traditional lead aprons, and non-lead aprons are the lightest weight option available. Once you have determined the core material you can then choose the type of protection needed.

X-Ray Apron Coverage Protection Options

When selecting the type of radiation protection required for your specific application, it is important to understand the unique benefits each style offers. The three common x-ray apron styles are front protection, front/back protection, and quick-drop. Front protection x-ray aprons are ideal for those who only require front-protection during procedures. X-ray aprons that offer front and back protection are designed for those who circulate and will have their back to the radiation source.  The quick- drop x-ray apron has been designed for those who need to remove the x-ray apron during surgery without breaking the sterile field.

Understanding The Various Style Options

Now that we understand the coverage and protection offered by the three main x-ray apron styles, we can take a closer look into the unique benefits available for each apron style.

Frontal Protection

X-ray aprons offering frontal protection are available with several important features including closure options, back type and frontal aprons designed for specialty applications. Front protection x-ray aprons are available with three different closure types including buckle closure, strap closure (tie style), and velcro closure.

There are several factors you will want to consider when choosing the right x-ray apron back type including apron weight, the length of procedure, and types of procedures performed. There are a variety of x-ray apron back types to choose from including the standard plain back apron, flex back apron, back relief/support apron, and fast wrap aprons. There are several speciality options available including pregnancy aprons (1.00mm Pb equivalency over fetal area) and lap guards, lead aprons with a sewn in thyroid collar, and the quick ship lightweight lead flex guard apron.

Front and Back Protection

There are several options to choose from when looking for front and back protection including full wrap aprons and vest/skirt aprons.  Standard medical x-ray protection levels commonly available  for front/back protection aprons are offered in the following combinations:

Front Protection Pb Equivalent/Back Protection Pb Equivalent

  • 0.50mm/0.25mm
  • 0.35mm/0.25mm
  • 0.25mm/0.25mm

Full Wrap Aprons

Full wrap aprons are available in several styles including full overwrap, special procedure, and tabard styles while providing maximum protection. Full overwrap aprons provide lumbar support which reduces fatigue and upper back stress during long procedures. Vest/skirt aprons create maximum weight distribution between the shoulders and hips which eliminates stress on the upper and lower back.

Full Overwrap Protection 

The full overwrap aprons are secured via velcro straps and provides maximum radiation protection which reduces back fatigue during long procedures.

Special Procedure

Special procedure aprons have velcro seems that allow the sides of the apron to separate when bending or sitting while still maintaining front protection.

 

Tabard Style

The tabard style apron – a tabard was a short coat that men commonly wore during the middle ages – is a sleeveless, single piece apron that has a right shoulder and side velcro closure that allows for easy access.

Vest/Skirt Aprons

Vest/skirt aprons provide greater flexibility to the wearer with regard to sitting, bending, or stooping. The skirt is designed for complete overlap to provide maximum protection. Many of the vest/skirt sizes can be mixed to provide maximum comfort and fit.

Quick Drop X-Ray Apron

The quick-drop apron style is designed to be worn over the scrub suit and under the O.R. gown for quick removal without breaking the sterile field after x-ray procedures are completed. The quick-drop style aprons do not have arm holes and require assistance from a second party when putting it on or removing the apron. Quick-drop aprons are available with velcro criss-cross back flaps that assure easy removal. The Xenolite O.R. Quick-Drop Apron allows for freedom of movement, maximum flexibility, and optimal comfort.

Questions? 

Now that we have reviewed the various benefits of the core materials used in x-ray aprons, the different types of protection, and highlighted some of the main benefits of the different types of apron styles, you should be able to choose the right x-ray apron for your specific needs. If you have any additional questions, feel free to leave a comment below or contact us via live chat on our e-commerce site during normal business hours (M-F 9-5 EST).

3 Different Types of Radiation Shielding Materials (Part 1)

What are the different types of radiation shielding materials?

Radiation shielding materials are used for a variety of radiologic applications. “The use of radiation in diagnosing and treating patients has significantly advanced the field of medicine and saved or extended countless lives¹.” Advances in technology and more sophisticated applications have improved standard treatments for the benefit of the patient. Radiation use does, however, come with risks. “Those who use radiation must be adequately trained in radiation safety, radiation physics, the biologic effects of radiation, and injury prevention to ensure patient safety¹.” One of the three major principles of mitigating external radiation exposure is shielding, “Using absorber material such as Plexiglas for beta particles and lead for X-rays and gamma rays is an effective way to reduce radiation exposure².”

Radiation Shielding Materials

Historically, radiation shielding materials have been manufactured from lead (Pb). Lead shielding, often used in a variety of applications including diagnostic imaging, radiation therapy, nuclear and industrial shielding. For the purpose of this post, we will focus on the three different types of materials used in manufacturing x-ray attenuating garments such as aprons, vests, and skirts.

Radiation Shielding Materials

Radiation shielding garments are commonly used to protect medical patients and workers from direct and secondary radiation during diagnostic imaging in hospitals, clinics and dental offices³. Historically, the attenuating qualities of lead made it “the element of choice” for radiation protection. However, advances in radiation shielding material technology have produced two alternative materials, lead composite and lead-free radiation shielding. Now medical professionals have several options when it comes to selecting their radiation shielding garments.

Traditional Lead (Pb) Shielding

Lead is a chemical element in the carbon group with the symbol Pb and atomic number 82. Lead is a soft, malleable and corrosion-resistant material³. The high density of lead (11.34 grams per cm³) makes it a useful shield against X-ray and gamma-ray radiation. Lead, in its pure form, is brittle and cannot be worn as apparel. To transform pure lead into a wearable radiation shielding material it’s mixed with binders and additives to make a flexible lead vinyl sheet. The lead sheets are then layered to the desired thickness to achieve the required lead equivalency and incorporated into the radiation shielding garment. There are typically three standard levels of lead equivalency protection for traditional lead radiation shielding garments including 0.25mm, 0.35mm and 0.5mm.

Lead (Pb) Composite Shielding

Lead composite shielding is a mixture of lead and other lighter weight metals. These lead-based composite blends are a proprietary mixture of lead and other heavy metals that attenuate radiation. The lead composite blend will vary by manufacturer as they have developed their own proprietary blends that may include a mixture of lead, tin, rubber, PVC vinyl and other proprietary attenuating metals. The lead-based composite blend radiation shielding garments are lighter (up to 25%) than regular grade lead and are available with the same lead equivalency protection levels.

Non-Lead (Pb) and Lead (Pb) Free Shielding

Similar to the proprietary blends of lead-based composite shielding materials the non-lead and lead-free shielding materials offer the same protection levels. Non-lead shielding materials are manufactured with additives and binders mixed with attenuating heavy metals that fall into the same category of materials as lead that also absorb or block radiation. These metals may include tin (Sn), antimony (Sb), tungsten (W) bismuth (Bi) or other elements. Non-lead aprons and lead-free aprons are recyclable and safe for non-hazardous disposal. The material blends are propriety to the specific manufacturer; therefore; the materials mentioned above are not representative of any specific manufacturer.

Benefits of Shielding Options

The three core material options discussed all have their own unique benefits and features. There are several factors you will want to consider when making your decision, including the specific procedure being performed, length of the procedure, and frequency of the procedure. To determine the proper amount of protection required in your working environment contact your radiation safety officer or radiation physicist. Selecting the right radiation shielding garment begins by identifying the core material option right for you.

(Part 2)  How to determine which x-ray apron material is right for you

In our next post, we will discuss how to determine which x-ray apron material is right for you. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

Thyroid Shield Fabric Options

Interested to know what material some of our thyroid shields are made of? Here’s a list of the material options to choose from:

Ripstop is a soft, flexible, lightweight nylon. Ripstop is 70 denier, 100% nylon and has box pattern weave to prevent rips and tears.

Diamond Ripstop is a thicker, heavier version of the standard ripstop. The diamond ripstop is 150 denier, 100% Polyester Diamond Taffeta pattern to prevent rips/tears and PU Coated.

Vinyl is a material which has a smooth surface and is easy to wipe clean. Embroidery & Pocket Options are not available when selecting this material. This material is 10 mil PVC vinyl.

Solid Color Nylon is 200 denier, 100% Oxford Nylon and PU Coated.

Designer Print Nylon is 200 denier, 100% Polyester with Transfer Print and  PU Coated.

Weblon: This fabric is fluid, moisture and tear resistant. It is also easy to wipe clean. Herculex II, Sure-Check Healthcare Fabric with PVC laminated Anti-Microbial Fabric Protection, 8.5 oz.

Have any questions on any of these materials? Let us know in the comment box below!

Whiteboard Wednesday: The Parts Of A Lead Eyeglass Frame

When selecting a pair of lead eyeglasses it is important to understand the various parts of lead glasses. Find out the common terms used to describe the many parts of lead eyeglasses on today’s Whiteboard Wednesday!

Whiteboard Wednesday: How To Size Yourself For Your Lead Glasses

Properly sizing yourself for your lead glasses is important and knowing the measurements before purchasing is helpful. With many different styles to choose from, it’s important find the style and size that will fit best. A few key measurements to look for:

  • Eye size: refers to the horizontal width in millimeters of one of the frame’s lenses
  • Bridge size: measurement is the distance in millimeters between the two lenses. It is measured between the two closest points of the two lenses.
  • Temple size: is measured along the length of the temple, from one end to the other, including the bend.

To learn more, watch today’s Whiteboard Wednesday video below!