The Importance Of Radiopaque Markers In Digital X-Ray

Radiopaque Anatomical Markers

Radiographers are taught from day one in school to place radiopaque anatomical markers within the primary beam of radiographs.  We do so as a method of “best practice” to properly distinguish the patient’s right from left on the radiographic image per legal requirements. Conditions like dextrocardia (when the heart is positioned on the right instead of the left) and situs inversus (when all of the internal organs are on the opposite side compared to normal anatomy) exist which can easily be misinterpreted and would normally cause a technologist to inappropriately orient the image to appear similar to normal anatomy.  But when radiographs misrepresent right from left, this presents a huge risk for medical errors.

Computed Radiography & Digital Radiography

When Computed Radiography and Digital Radiography entered the scene, radiologic technologists were provided with a method of digitally annotating right and left.  This further led some to question the necessity of placing radiopaque anatomical markers within the primary beam of each radiograph.  If you’re like me, you’ve more than likely witnessed a decline in the use of markers in your radiology department but make no mistake; they are more necessary now than ever with the introduction of digital radiography.

A Cautionary Tale

Several years ago when I was working with a new Computed Radiography system in a hospital, I was on portable-duty which consisted of 50-60 portable chest and abdomen exams per day on average.  Another technologist, who was assigned the “float” shift, was asked to rotate where needed within the department.  I asked this technologist for help with a STAT portable chest x-ray in ICU around mid-morning, and by mid-afternoon I found myself in the Chief Radiologist’s office with the Radiology Director and Manager.  The door was closed, faces were red, and it was uncomfortably quiet.

After what seemed like an eternity, the Chief Radiologist displayed a portable chest radiograph on his monitor and asked “do you recognize this exam?”  I looked for several seconds and said, “No, I actually don’t.”  They looked at one another confused, and then asked me to critique the image.  I started to go through my image critique steps learned in school one by one, noting the presence of what I thought might be a pneumothorax, and they stopped me when I said there was no marker present.  The radiologist then asked me, “How would you know if this exam was oriented properly on the screen?”  I rattled off some details that would give anyone clues, but when I discussed the location of the heart, he stopped me again.  He horizontally flipped the image and stated “is this hung correctly?”  Ultimately, I concluded that there was no way to know whether the exam was hung appropriately due to lack of a radiopaque anatomical marker or a blocker (which we could use in film/screen imaging to determine if we knew the projection – PA vs. AP).

They all looked at one another again and the radiologist asked me “Did you perform this radiograph?”  I did not remember viewing an image similar to that one during my exams performed that day, so I let them know I didn’t remember performing it.  They asked me if anyone was helping me throughout the day, and my heart sunk, knowing I had to name the only person I had asked for help that day.  They invited me to exit the room and resume my shift.  My manager encouraged me to continue using my markers, and he informed me he would follow up with me before I left for the day.  The door closed behind me.

Later that afternoon, I was called back into the same room that displayed the same chest radiograph.  The radiologist was a bit less intimidating, but not much.  He explained to me that the radiograph indeed displayed a pneumothorax… a “tension pneumothorax.”  He asked if I knew what that was, and at the time I did not.  A tension pneumothorax occurs when one lung is punctured and air enters the pleural cavity around the punctured lung.  The “tension” portion occurs because air entering is not allowed to escape the pleural cavity, and the mediastinal structures as a result are shifted to the opposite side (in this case, from the patient’s left to their right).

After their investigation, it was concluded that the technologist exposed the image without placing a radiopaque marker within the primary beam.  When the image displayed at the computer terminal during processing, it was most likely appropriately displayed.  Due to the appearance of the mediastinal organs on the patient’s right side, the technologist viewed prior radiographs to ensure the patient had normal anatomy (which he confirmed).  He then mistakenly flipped the image horizontally so that the heart appeared on what he thought was the patient’s left side, digitally annotated a “left” marker, then sent the image to the radiologist for dictation.

The radiologist, upon viewing this STAT exam, called the physician who was in ICU and informed them that the patient had a pneumothorax on the right side, although it was actually a tension pneumothorax on the patient’s left.  Because the technologist had inappropriately flipped the image, the ordering physician inserted a chest tube on the wrong side, into the unaffected lung, causing further complication which lead to a Code Blue being called and a much longer recovery process for the patient who was already undergoing treatment for several other problems.

I found out I was originally called into the Chief Radiologist’s office immediately following a 30-minute scolding by that patient’s physician who inserted the chest tube on the wrong side because of an error made in the radiology department.  The patient eventually recovered, but imagine what could have happened as a result of the technologist’s error.  I was glad to be off the hook, but I never found out if the technologist was disciplined or if charges were ever pressed against the hospital.

Lessons Learned

Having experienced something like this, it is easy to see the importance of radiopaque markers on a radiograph.  It is discouraging to know that many departments see a decline in their usage simply because we can place one there after the image is processed; because it’s easy.  It may be true that it is more difficult to remember to place a marker or to remember to simply bring your markers to work with you, however, It is my opinion that allowing this to happen not only encourages error, but causes liability for the technologist, radiologist, and institution that is providing radiographic services.  It should be a goal to have radiopaque anatomical markers on 100% of radiographs.  It is required for images to be admissible in a court of law, and it truly is “best practice.”

Risks vs. Benefits

Whether images need to be repeated if a marker is occasionally not visible on an image, warrants a risks vs. benefits discussion with on-site personnel including the radiologist/s.  Technologists can be held accountable, however, during evaluations and upon the occurrence of failure to use these markers.  Furthermore, it is important for employers to encourage and enable technologists to use these markers and have a quality assurance process with follow-up.  It would also be wise to consider other options such as purchasing disposable, single-use markers which can be utilized for isolation cases which infection control becomes an issue, or for when a technologist misplaces their markers.  There are tools at our disposal which are cost-effective that can prevent situations like the one mentioned earlier.

About the Author 

Jeremy Enfinger is an experienced Radiologic Technologist, Radiography Program Instructor, and published author. He has served in leadership roles in hospital, outpatient and academic settings. His experience includes writing examination questions for the national ARRT Radiography Exam and multiple – modality training. He continues to pursue excellence in education and patient care. An avid blogger, Jeremy strives to promote standards of excellence in imaging through his online community with the sharing of veteran tips and techniques for high-quality imaging.

Free eBook

 

For any radiologic technologist looking to make improvements and fine-tune their image critique skills; this is a must-have resource. To receive your copy first, sign-up for the “Topics in Radiography” email list and you’ll be able to download the book for free on April 18, 2015.

 

 

 

How Do I Select The Right Laser Eye Protection?

LASER stands for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers emit a narrow beam of light and that beam of light is emitted in short bursts and focuses precisely on the desired target. The energy emitted by the laser can be absorbed, scattered, transmitted or reflected. When used in medical procedures, lasers transmit most of their energy to the intended target and that is why proper laser eye protection is so important.

The Eye is Vulnerable to Laser Radiation

The human eye is extremely vulnerable to laser radiation. When working with medium to high-powered laser systems, it is vital to wear the correct laser eye protection for the specified laser type. Unprotected exposure to lasers can result in the development of cataracts or even a corneal burn, which can ultimately result in vision loss. By selecting and wearing the appropriate pair of laser safety glasses, medical personnel can keep their eyes protected from applications and procedures that require a laser system. Protective laser safety glasses must be matched in terms of wavelength frequency and the type of laser being used (e.g., YAG laser glasses, Holmium laser glasses) for your specific application. That is why it is important to understand the consequences of laser radiation exposure.

3 Ways Lasers Can Damage Your Eyes

There are three ways that lasers can damage your eyes including thermal, photochemical, and mechanical damage. Laser safety glasses provide valuable laser eye protection by shielding vulnerable eye tissue from the high-intensity radiation emitted. Laser safety glasses are not only a vital safety component, they are also required in all facilities where medical, surgical, cosmetic or dental laser procedures are performed. Laser safety glasses are also used in research and forensic laboratories.

What Types of Eye Protection are Available?

There are several levels of laser eye protection available. Laser safety glasses are measured in optical density and this number reflects the ability of the filter to block the light that is transmitted at a particular wavelength. The higher the optical density, the more light from the wavelength is blocked. For example, laser safety glasses with an optical density of seven will block all but 0.00001% of the laser frequency.

How Do I Select the Right Laser Eye Protection?

Selecting the right laser eye protection may seem overwhelming; we have simplified the selection process for you by creating a white paper that discusses the eight key factors you’ll want to consider when selecting the right laser eye protection. It is extremely important to protect your eyes and yourself from the harmful effects of laser radiation. Remember, the damage done to your eyes from laser radiation exposure can be permanent. If you have any additional questions regarding how to select the right laser eye protection please comment below or email us at info@universalmedicalinc.com.

 

 

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How Do I Order Prescription Lead Glasses?

Question: How Do I Order Prescription Lead Glasses?

This is a frequently asked question that we receive from our new and existing customers. This post will walk you through the necessary steps to ensure that your order is processed in a timely manner. It is our goal to make your experience as painless as possible.

We currently offer over 75 different styles of lead glasses available with different types of enhancements. There are three prescription lens types available, including single vision, lined bifocal, and progressive bifocal (progressive lenses). Please note that the availability of Rx lenses will vary by frame type.

Step 1 – Find your pair of lead glasses

Step 2 – Determine prescription type

  • Single vision
  • Lined bifocal
  • Progressive bifocal (no-lines)

Step 3 – Choose Your Lens Style

Please note that options will vary by frame style and manufacturer. Due to the custom nature of prescription lead glasses they cannot be returned.

  • Standard
  • Anti-reflective (not available with prescription lens)
  • Fog free (not available with prescription lens)
  • Single vision Rx
  • Lined Bifocal Rx
  • Progressive bifocal Rx

Pricing adjusts in real-time as you add enhancements to the frames. The single vision, lined bifocal, and progressive bifocal prescription radiation safety lenses all offer the industry standard 0.75mm lead equivalency and are manufactured using SCHOTT SF-6 HT radiation resistant glass.

Step 4 – Choose frame color

Please note that color options will vary by frame style and manufacturer

Step 5 (Optional) – Add frame imprint text

  • Frames will be laser engraved
  • Imprint limit is 35 characters (may vary by model)
  • Engraved glasses are non-returnable

 Step 6 – Select desired quantity and click “add to cart”

Step 7 – Review your order

  • Review your order for accuracy

 

Step 8Proceed to checkout

  • Returning customers can sign in for faster checkout
  • New customers can create a personal account (Benefits of registering: quick checkout on future orders, easy order tracking, and special offers)

Step 9 – Enter billing and shipping information

  • Enter your billing information
  • Enter your shipping information
  • Choose your shipping method (Selecting Next Day or 2nd Day Air will only change the shipping transit time, as prescription lenses are made to order)
  • Enter payment information

Step 10 – Add Prescription Information

Please note that the manufacturer will contact us if they have any additional questions regarding the prescription after their initial review to ensure accuracy.

  • Add prescription information in the “Order Comments/Special Instructions” box
  • Include OD/OS values from prescription
  • Include Pupillary Distance (PD)
  • Prescriptions can be faxed to 1-800-535-6229
  • Prescriptions can be emailed to order@universalmedicalinc.com

Ordering Information

Prescription lead glasses normally take at least two weeks to produce (may vary depending on item availability). If you need prescription lenses before a certain date contact, please customer service for specific information regarding frame availability and production time. As mentioned above, selecting priority shipping will only expedite the transit time of the package. Since the prescription lenses are made for your unique eye prescription, production times will vary. In an upcoming post, we will discuss the different prescription lens types that we offer in more detail. If you’re curious as to how prescription lead glasses are made, you’ll want to make sure and check out our video.

Questions? Comments? 

Not sure what type of frame is right for you? Many of our lead glasses have product demonstration videos to help you find the right style. If you have any additional questions, please feel free to contact us or leave a comment in the box below.

7 Reasons To Pick These Carbon Fiber Armboards

Why Carbon Fiber? 

Carbon fiber is a popular material used in many industries including the medical device field, aerospace, and automotive engineering. The fiber-reinforced polymer which contains carbon fibers is extremely strong and lightweight. Although carbon fiber may be more expensive when compared to other materials, the impressive strength-to-weight ratio and rigidity of carbon fiber makes it an excellent candidate for various immobilization and medical support devices. This fiber-reinforced polymer also helps keep radiation doses to a minimum.

Medical Applications of Carbon Fiber

Carbon fiber provides one distinct advantage over other materials in the medical device field, that advantage is that carbon fiber is radiolucent, meaning that it is virtually transparent to x-rays and appears black on x-ray images. The radiolucent quality of carbon fiber makes it an excellent material to support limbs being x-rayed or treated with radiation. This is why you may have noticed more surgical table accessories like carbon fiber armboards appearing in hospitals and clinics.

Patient Positioning Challenges 

Medical imaging equipment (X-ray systems and CT scanners) will often present unique patient positioning challenges to medical personnel. Listed below are some of the attributes patient positioning systems will generally require for overall patient safety and image quality:

  • Lightweight
  • Durability and strength
  • Rigidity
  • Minimal impact to image quality (e.g. artifacts)

7 Reasons Why You Will Want To Choose Carbon Fiber Armboards

  1. Fully radiolucent
  2. High strength-to-weight ratio
  3. No mounting hardware is required for setup or breakdown
  4. 180° of lateral rotation
  5. Easy setup and removal
  6. Fold together for safe and compact storage
  7. Two armboard styles (rail mount carbon fiber armboard with quick release swivel and shoulder mount carbon fiber armboard with hexagonal base)

Rail Mount Carbon Fiber Armboard with Quick Release Swivel

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Strength And Durability

The rail mount carbon fiber armboard has been engineered to achieve a high degree of strength, durability, and radiolucency. Utilizing a quick release mounting mechanism, the carbon fiber armboard attaches quickly and easily to any surgical table that has a standard side rail.

Radiolucent 

This single, radiolucent armboard allows complete imaging of the arm and can be used in conjunction with other carbon fiber tabletops and extensions where ionizing radiation (x-ray) is used for imaging. Ideal for imaging in a variety of medical settings, including hospitals, clinics, and private practices. This armboard has been designed for use as an imaging platform and is not to be used as a surgical platform.

Rail Mount Carbon Fiber Armboard Specifications

Dimensions 

  • 26″ Length
  • 5.5″ Width

Maximum Capacity Tested Per ISO 6061

  • 25 pounds

Aluminum Equivalency 

  • AAE @ 100 kVp = 1.15mm

Accessories  

An optional armboard pad is available and has been specifically designed for the rail mount carbon fiber armboard with quick release swivel. Constructed of high-density comfort foam, the 2″ thick pad is covered with a conductive vinyl cover for easy cleaning and patient comfort.

Shoulder Mount Carbon Fiber Armboard With Hexagonal Base

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High Strength-To-Weight Ratio

The shoulder mount carbon fiber armboard has been engineered to provide the highest strength, durability, and radiolucency of any armboard on the market today.

Easy Setup and Breakdown 

Simply place the hexagonal base under the surgical table pad. By using the weight of the patient to hold the armboard in place, removal is quick and easy. A rubber brake disc is used to keep the board in position under the weight of the patient’s arm. The unique pivoting attachment allows for a full 180 degree of lateral adjustment, making patient positioning more efficient.

Radiolucent 

This shoulder mount radiolucent armboard allows for the complete imaging of the arm and can be used in conjunction with other carbon fiber tabletops and extensions where ionizing radiation (x-ray) is used for imaging. This armboard has been designed for use as an imaging platform and is not to be used as a surgical platform.

Shoulder Mount Carbon Fiber Armboard Specifications

Dimensions 

Swivel Base

  • 14″ Length
  • 18″ Width

Armboard

  • 27″ Length
  • 5.5″ Width

Maximum Capacity Tested Per ISO 6061

  • 25 pounds

Aluminum Equivalency 

  • AAE @ 100 kVp = 1.15mm

Accessories  

An optional armboard pad is available and has been specifically designed for the shoulder mount carbon fiber armboard with quick release swivel. Constructed of high density comfort foam, the 2″ thick pad is covered with a conductive vinyl cover for easy cleaning and patient comfort.

Material Of Choice

These two unique carbon fiber armboards are ideal for improving positioning accuracy for optimum imaging results. The physical properties and characteristics of carbon fiber make it an excellent material for use in the medical device field. The impressive strength-to-weight ratio, rigidity and radiolucency of the carbon fiber are attributes that make it the material of choice for supporting limbs being x-rayed or treated with radiation.

Share Your Experience

Have you used carbon fiber in your imaging department? Would you like to share your experience with us? We’d like to hear from you and learn more about your experiences. In an upcoming post, we will discuss how to properly clean and disinfect carbon fiber armboards and pads. Sign up for our blog and we will notify you when this post is available.

5 Reasons Why You Should Use Lead Apron Storage Racks

Lead Apron Storage

Improper storage of your lead apron can reduce the attenuating qualities of the apron and ultimately reduce the level of radiation protection your apron provides. Lead apron storage racks come in a variety of styles and configurations to meet the specific needs of your medical facility.

Protection From Radiation Exposure

Lead aprons are used in medical facilities to protect workers and patients from x-ray radiation exposure from diagnostic radiology procedures. Lead aprons are protective garments that have been designed to shield the body from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation during medical imaging procedures.

“As is the case with many protective garments, it is important to remember that a lead apron is only effective when it is worn properly, matched with the appropriate radiation energy and is used in a safe and regularly inspected environment.” – Stanford’s Radiation Protection Guidance for Hospital Staff¹ 

Lead Apron Integrity Check

Medical personnel who are required to wear lead aprons or other related radiation protection devices should visually inspect these protective garments prior to each use for obvious signs of damage such rips and tears, sagging lead, and cracks in the lead lining.

Not sure if a lead apron rack is necessary?

1.  To ensure that you are properly protected. When a lead apron hasn’t been stored properly, you could be putting yourself at risk for increased exposure to ionizing radiation. Small cracks and holes can develop in the lead lining that may not be visible on the exterior fabric of the lead apron.

“Lead aprons should be checked fluoroscopically at least on an annual basis for their shielding integrity².” -Radiology Compliance Branch (Radiation Protection Section), NC Department of Health and Human Services

2.  To protect your radiation protection investment. Properly storing your lead aprons will extend the useful life of the apron by helping prevent damage to the lead lining and the exterior fabric of the lead apron. Aprons should never be folded or creased. Lead aprons should be hung up by the shoulder(s) or on an approved apron hanger. Aprons should not be stored on a flat surface. Even incorrect storage for a short time can result in damage that is not visible to the naked eye.

3. To improve the organization of lead aprons. Managing lead aprons is one task that the imaging director has to cross off their to-do list, although it is probably not at the top of their list. Lead aprons play a vital role in protecting physicians, imaging staff, and patients from unnecessary exposure to ionizing radiation during diagnostic imaging procedures. Properly organizing your aprons will simplify the tracking process and will make State or Joint Commission inspections easier.

4. To help improve efficiency. Having a centralized location to properly store lead aprons will keep them safe and easily accessible the next time they are needed. Properly managing lead aprons can be a time-consuming task, utilizing an appropriate lead apron storage rack can help reduce time spent tracking aprons in the medical facility. As departments grow, it is important to have an apron storage process in place to keep aprons from getting mixed between departments.

5. To help reduce the occurrence of missing aprons. Keeping track of aprons can be difficult, especially when physicians and imaging staff spend time at multiple facilities. Lead apron racks make storage easier and help reduce the chance of lead aprons getting moved between departments and other medical facilities.

Example of A Wall Mounted Apron Rack

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Stay Neat And Organized

Maintaining a neat, uncluttered imaging environment is important in detail orientated medical fields. Lead apron racks allow your facility to provide medical staff with a well-organized treatment facility and workspace. When the necessary equipment is readily available on an x-ray apron rack in a centralized location, X-ray procedures will be completed efficiently and effectively.

 

Do You Know Your Occupational Radiation Dose?

Ionizing Radiation Exposure 

Ionizing radiation is radiation with enough energy so that during an interaction with an atom, it can remove tightly bound electrons from the orbit of an atom, causing the atom to become charged or ionized¹.

X-radiation

X-rays are a type ionizing radiation, which are electromagnetic, indirectly ionizing radiation. X-ray machines and radiation emitting sources are used in hospitals for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Hospital employees or “occupational workers” who work in radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation oncology, and some laboratories are specifically trained in the operation of machines that emit radiation as well as the handling of radioactive materials and sources.

Shortly after Wilhelm Roentgen’s discovery of X-rays in 1895 , concern over the biological effects of ionizing radiation began. Over the past 100 years, diagnostic radiology has evolved from the original, unrefined practices to the advanced medical imaging techniques that are now an essential tool for all branches and specialties.

Ionizing radiation provides many benefits, but also has the potential to cause harm to patients and medical personnel. Throughout the years, multiple recommendations regarding occupational exposure limits have been developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and other radiation protection groups. The primary guidelines established have had two principle objectives: 1) to prevent acute exposure; and 2) to limit chronic exposure to “acceptable” levels.

The ALARA Principle

Based on the conservative assumption, current guidelines state that there is no safe level of radiation exposure. Even the smallest exposure to ionizing radiation has some probability of causing a stochastic effect, such as cancer. The ALARA principle is based upon this assumption and has led to the general philosophy of keeping exposures below recommended levels and regulation limits. ALARA is a basic radiation safety principle and means that every reasonable effort must be made to keep the dose to workers and the public “as low as reasonably achievable.”

Occupational Exposure

Regulatory limits for occupational exposure are found in Title 10 Part 20 [Standards For Protection Against Radiation] of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Code of Federal Regulations, and in equivalent state regulations. The annual occupational dose limits have been derived from a study of the observed health effects of radiation on humans and animals during the 20th century². By creating these maximum exposure limits, occupationally exposed radiation workers will be subjected to a level of risk no greater than that in other occupations subject to high safety standards.

Units of Measure

Absorption of radiation can cause tissue damage, therefore a unit of measuring the damage and ensuring that the damage is kept to a minimum is necessary. The amount of radiation energy absorbed in a body is referred to as dose, therefore dose is the amount of radiation you receive. Dose rate indicates how fast you receive the dose or the intensity of the radiation.

  • Dose – generally measured in mrem
  • Dose rate – generally measured in mrem/hr.

Dose-equivalent or rem is a special unit used for measuring dose in a person.

“The rem is the unit used for equating radiation absorption with biological damage.” 

The rem is a rather large unit of measure. Consequently, radiation exposure is generally measured in thousandths of a rem – or a millirem as shown in the table above.

1 rem = 1000 millirem

Occupational radiation exposure is recorded in rems or Roentgen equivalent man. The rem factors in the energy absorbed and the relative biological effect on the body due to the different types of radiation (quality factor). The rem is a measure of the relative harm or risk caused by a given dose of radiation when compared to other doses of radiation of any type. Put simply, the rem can be thought of as the unit of biological hazard.

Maximum Annual Occupational Dose
Whole Body5000 millirem
Extremities 50000 millirem
Lens of the Eye15000 millirem
Fetus500 millirem*
Individuals in the General Public100 millirem

*500 millirem for the fetus is during the gestation period

Sources:

//www.who.int/ionizing_radiation/about/what_is_ir/en/

//www.jlab.org/div_dept/train/rad_guide/fund.html

Radiation Shielding: A Key Radiation Protection Principle

Time, Distance, and Shielding

Time, distance, and shielding are the three basic concepts of radiation protection that apply to all types of ionizing radiation. Shielding simply means having something that will absorb radiation between the source of the radiation and the area to be protected. Radiation shielding is based on the principle of attenuation, which is the gradual loss in intensity of any energy through a medium.

Lead acts as a barrier to reduce a ray’s effect by blocking or bouncing particles through a barrier material.  When X-ray photons interact with matter, the quantity is reduced from the original x-ray beam. Attenuation is the result of interactions between x-ray and matter that include absorption and scatter. Differential absorption increases as kVp decreases. The greater the shielding around a radiation source, the smaller the exposure.

X-Ray And Gamma Rays

X-ray and gamma rays are forms of electromagnetic radiation that occur with higher energy levels than those displayed by ultraviolet or visible light. Thick, dense shielding, such as lead, is necessary to protect against the energy emitted from x-rays. Shielding and x-ray room design is a very important consideration for any healthcare facility that  performs diagnostic and interventional radiology.

The purpose of shielding is to protect the patients (when not being examined), X-Ray department staff, visitors and the general public, as well as the people working near the  X-Ray facility. There are three sources of radiation that must be shielded; scattered or secondary (from the patient), primary (the x-ray beam), and leakage (from the x-ray tube).

Scatter Radiation

Diagnostic x-ray procedures frequently require medical personnel to remain in the exam room where they are subjected to scatter radiation. Lead aprons offer valuable protection from radiation exposure but there are times that a mobile lead radiation barrier is required to provide a full body shielding barrier.

Imaging procedures performed in remote locations, such as operating rooms, cardiac catheterization labs, and special procedure rooms pose an added challenge to protect against radiation exposure. Lead barriers are excellent for imaging procedures using ionizing radiation such as fluoroscopy, x-ray, mammography and CT.

Lead Shielding

The use of shielding provides a barrier between you and the source of the radiation. Some examples of shielding are lead aprons, lead glasses, thyroid shields and portable or mobile lead shields. Mobile lead shields of at least 0.25 mm lead equivalency are recommended to be used by anyone working near the table during fluoroscopy procedures when possible. Remember to follow ALARA “as low as reasonably achievable” guidelines when involved in diagnostic or interventional radiology procedures. Lead garments, lead gloves, thyroid shields, leaded glasses, lead drapes, as well as mobile and stationary lead barriers between the patient and personnel all reduce exposure to scatter radiation.

Questions? Comments? 

If you have any questions regarding the selection of lead barriers or mobile lead shields, please feel free to leave a comment below or connect with us over on our Google+ community page and keep the discussion going!

Thyroid Shield Fabric Options

Interested to know what material some of our thyroid shields are made of? Here’s a list of the material options to choose from:

Ripstop is a soft, flexible, lightweight nylon. Ripstop is 70 denier, 100% nylon and has box pattern weave to prevent rips and tears.

Diamond Ripstop is a thicker, heavier version of the standard ripstop. The diamond ripstop is 150 denier, 100% Polyester Diamond Taffeta pattern to prevent rips/tears and PU Coated.

Vinyl is a material which has a smooth surface and is easy to wipe clean. Embroidery & Pocket Options are not available when selecting this material. This material is 10 mil PVC vinyl.

Solid Color Nylon is 200 denier, 100% Oxford Nylon and PU Coated.

Designer Print Nylon is 200 denier, 100% Polyester with Transfer Print and  PU Coated.

Weblon: This fabric is fluid, moisture and tear resistant. It is also easy to wipe clean. Herculex II, Sure-Check Healthcare Fabric with PVC laminated Anti-Microbial Fabric Protection, 8.5 oz.

Have any questions on any of these materials? Let us know in the comment box below!

Looking To Spice Up Your X-Ray Markers?

Looking To Spice Up Your X-Ray Markers? 

Personalizing your x-ray markers with your initials is a fun and easy way to keep track of the X-rays that you have taken. Many medical facilities require radiologists, radiologic technologists and technicians to place their initials on X-ray markers. By choosing high-quality X-ray markers, you’ll be able to clearly, easily, and permanently identify your radiographs.

What Are My Options?

You can choose from a variety of non-lead casings including aluminum, aluminum-copper, plastic-copper, and plastic. The lead letters are embedded in a crystal-clear epoxy for durability and safety. The background of durable aluminum adds density and enhances the image.

Personalization

Many of the x-ray markers allow for personalization. In addition to the standard Left (Blue) and Right (Red) indicators, you can personalize your x-ray markers by adding 1 to 3 characters (e.g. initials).

Available X-Ray Marker Casings

The following types of X-ray marker casings are available:

  • Aluminum
  • Aluminum-Copper (Designed for high KV)
  • Plastic-Copper
  • Plastic

Made Just For You!

X-ray markers are made especially for you. Due to the custom nature of these X-ray markers you can expect to receive your markers in 10-14 business days plus transit time from the time you place your order.

Looking For Position Markers? 

Position markers indicate laterality (Left or Right) and the inclination of the patient. Small lead balls inside these markers indicate whether the patient is horizontal or shows direction of inclination. You can purchase them with or without initials and with aluminum or molded plastic backing.

Are You Tired Of Losing Your X-Ray Markers?

Losing X-ray markers can be expensive, not to mention that it can be frustrating and time-consuming to try and locate your missing markers. Personalize your markers with your initials and stop wasting time chasing down your missing X-ray markers.

Looking To Order?

Have a question? We will be glad to answer any questions you might have. Leave a comment below, email, call or visit our message us via Live Chat.

 

Whiteboard Wednesday: Lens Enhancements For Your Lead Glasses

Some radiation glasses offer lens enhancement options. For example, we offer fog-free lens or an anti-reflective coating that can be added to your lead glasses. Watch today’s Whiteboard Wednesday as we discuss the benefits of each lens enhancement option!