3 Advantages Of Disposable Skin Markers In Mammography

Is your medical facility performing mammograms?

If so, are you using disposable skin markers during these exams?

Disposable skin markers are a must-have for mammography. Markers are placed over a nipple, mole, scar, area of concern or other features that could be confused with a lesion. When performing screening mammograms, skin markers can save time, improve accuracy, enhance communication and provide a better experience for the patient.

Low-Dose X-Ray System

A mammogram is an X-ray image of the breast. Mammography is a specific type of imaging that uses a low-dose X-ray system that emits ionizing radiation to create images of the breast, allowing the radiologist, a physician specially trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations, to analyze the images and send a signed report to the primary care or referring physician, who will then discuss the results with the patient.

Reduce Repeat Examinations

Skin markers are an important tool in mammography. Costly repeat examinations can be reduced dramatically by clearly identifying the nipple with a lead ball nipple marker. For example, the Suremark Lead Ball Nipple Marker Label is one of our most popular marker labels for general use purposes. The Suremark label is ideal for distinguishing between a nipple shadow and a lesion.

Easily Locate Raised Moles

Suremark Mole Markers are uniquely designed to locate raised moles and other skin nevi with overshadowing microcalcifications. The radiolucent ring, when placed around a protuberance, prevents flattening due to compression. The mole markers are available with two reference points or three reference points. Ideal for mediolateral oblique view or MLO exams as well as dense breast tissue, these radiolucent mole markers will not burnout.

Improve Patient Comfort

Mammograms are uncomfortable enough for patients with the painful removal of nipple markers. Keeping patient comfort in mind, the Suremark Relief Tabs feature a unique adhesive-free center that won’t stick to sensitive areas of the skin. By using disposable skin markers, exam results will be more accurate and the overall patient experience will be improved.

Not familiar with the Suremark brand? Why not try a sample and compare them to your existing skin markers?

 

 

 

Avoiding Retained Surgical Items In The OR

Avoiding Serious Reportable Events (“Never Events”) In The OR

Retained Surgical Items (RSI) are included in the National Quality Forum’s list of Serious Reportable Events (commonly referred to as “Never Events”) as a, “foreign object unintentionally retained after surgery.” The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will no longer pay the extra cost of treating the following categories of conditions that occur while the patient is in the hospital. (Section 5001(c) of the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) of 2005).

  • pressure ulcer stages III and IV;
  • falls and trauma;
  • surgical site infection after bariatric surgery for obesity, certain orthopedic procedures, and bypass surgery (mediastinitis)
  • vascular-catheter associated infection;
  • administration of incompatible blood;
  • air embolism; and
  • foreign object unintentionally retained after surgery 

The National Quality Forum (NQF) defines Never Events as errors in medical care that are of concern to both the public and health care professionals and providers, clearly identifiable and measurable (and thus feasible to include in a reporting system), and of a nature such that the risk of occurrence is significantly influenced by the policies and procedures if the health care organization.

Nothing Left Behind: A National Surgical Patient-Safety Project To Prevent Retained Surgical Items

The site www.nothingleftbehind.org is an educational resource that was started in October 2004 to work with multiple healthcare stakeholder to make sure Retained Surgical Items (RSI) become a true “never” event. The categorical classification of “foreign object unintentionally retained after surgery” may include swallowed pennies, pins, shrapnel, bullets and other objects while surgical items are the tools and materials that we use in procedures to heal not to harm¹.

Patient Safety Problem 

“More than a dozen times a day, doctors sew up patients with sponges and other supplies mistakenly left inside. The mistake can cost some victims their lives².” Although there is no federal reporting requirement, research studies and government data suggests that there are between 4,500 and 6,000 retained surgical items left in patients every year in the United States. “That’s up to twice government estimates, which run closer to 3,000 cases, and sponges account for more than two-thirds of all incidents².”

Simple Solution? 

According to Atul Gawande, a Harvard public health professor and surgeon at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, “It’s a recurrent, persistent and nearly totally avoidable problem…There are technologies that reduce the risk, that actually reduce the overall cost (to hospitals and insurer), and yet they are not the standard. That, to me, is the shocking thing.”

Sponge-Tracking Technology

Research shows that sponges account for 67% of all surgical items mistakenly left in patients². Data complied by Medicare estimates the cost of hospitalizations involving a lost sponge or instrument at more than $60,000 per case, according to USA Today.

Why have so few hospitals adopted systems to prevent lost sponge incidences?

A USA Today survey of companies that manufacture the sponge-tracking technology found that fewer than 15% of U.S. hospitals use sponges equipped with tracking devices, which reduce the risk of leaving a sponge in a patient, that add an additional cost $8 to $12 per surgery.

Barcodes and X-Rays at U-M

Surgeons at the University of Michigan Health System created a system to prevent retained surgical items. “In its effort to be the safest hospital in the country, the U-M uses new technology to insure no objects are left behind in surgery³.” According to Ella Kazerooni, M.D., M.S., professor of radiology at the U-M and associate chair of clinical affairs at the U-M Health System, “Having a foreign object left behind during surgery is something we consider a ‘never event’. It’s something that should never happen³.”

Methods Put Into Practice

  • Bar-coded sponges – sponges have been bar-coded so that they can be scanned when they are used and again when they are taken out of the body. Computers assist the medical staff in counting and if there is a count discrepancy they will know to search the surgical field. (Bar-coded sponges also contain a radiopaque tag)
  • Electronic radiology orders – X-rays are used to find retained items while the patient is still in the OR.

“RSIs can be discovered hours to years after the initial operation and a second operation may be required for removal¹.” According to Dr.Gibbs, author of the Nothing Left Behind site (educational resource), “New ways of thinking about human error and OR practices and understanding systemic changes in OR culture are required to prevent this event. System fixes require knowledge and information, a winning strategy, consistent multi-stakeholder engagement and leadership¹.”

Preventing Future Problems

According to the Institute of Medicine, “the problem is not bad people; the problem is that the system needs to be made safer.” Some hospitals have required four counts of sponges and instruments to improve the system and reduce the number or accidents; while careful counting could prevent some mistakes, counting carries its own risks. Human error can play a major role in RSI incidences, as a majority of the cases of RSI occur under a reported correct count.

Takeaways

  • Bar coding technology can be used to improve counting and tracking sponges in the OR
  • Bar coded sponge management systems are cost-effective
  • Sponge tracking systems are part of a growing trend in which bar coding is utilized to improve the management of medical supplies, equipment and tools throughout the hospital

 

Resources: 

1. Nothing Left Behind: A National Surgical Patient Safety Project To Prevent Retained Surgical Items

//www.nothingleftbehind.org/

2. Eisler, Peter. “What Surgeons Leave behind Costs Some Patients Dearly.”USA Today. Gannett, 08 Mar. 2013. Web. 10 Sept. 2014.

//www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/03/08/surgery-sponges-lost-supplies-patients-fatal-risk/1969603/

3. “University of Michigan Health System Creates System to Prevent Retained Surgical Items.” Web log post. University of Michigan. N.p., 06 Feb. 2012. Web. 10 Sept. 2014.

//www.uofmhealth.org/news/retained-surgical-items-0206

Whiteboard Wednesday: Surgeon Cooling Systems

How Do Surgeons Stay Cool In The Operating Room?

Today on Whiteboard Wednesday we talk about how surgeons stay cool in the operating room. A major concern for medical staff working in the OR is fatigue caused by overheating.  Overheating is caused by the multiple layers surgeons and staff must wear for protection. During certain procedures the surgeon’s body heat is intensified, the CoolVest can help keep the surgeon more comfortable and alert.

What Is A Surgeon Cooling System?

The CoolVest System is a unique and innovative personal cooling system that is designed to keep surgeons cool and focused while performing surgery. The Single-Surgeon CoolVest System allows you to regulate your personal comfort so that you won’t perspire, suffer fatigue or lose concentration. The surgeon cooling system includes a lightweight vest that is constructed of hospital-grade ventilated nylon for maximum cooling, a variable flow control with quick-dry disconnect, wheeled cart with handle for convenient portability, and a UL listed cooler with variable flow 110V pump.

How Does The Surgeon Cooling System Work?  

The CoolVest is worn over scrubs and under surgical gowns. The tubing connection is located at the lower back of the garment to help keep the water supply tubing from interfering with the sterile field. Cooling tubes are located in the front and back of the garment for maximum cooling. The patented, thin-walled, non-kink tubing has been specifically designed for use under lead aprons.

Setup

  1. To begin, the cooling unit is filled with a mixture of approximately one gallon of water and ice (preferably block ice) or cube ice to the top of the unit.
  2. After the unit has been properly filled, you will want to attach the 8 foot insulated supply hose (quick disconnect) to the CoolVest.
  3. Apply the protective hose cover and then attach the other end of the insulated supply hose to the cooling unit.
  4. Listen for an audible click from both quick disconnect hose connections to ensure that they are properly connected.

Operation

  1. Once the supply hose has been properly protected and connected, you will want to plug the cooling unit’s electrical adapter into a grounded 110V outlet.
  2. Turn the unit on using the green On/Off power switch.
  3. Allow the unit to cycle until L.E.D indicator on Speed Control is activated (30 second pump start delay).
  4. Press “Ice Cube” on the Speed Control display on the lid of the system to start unit at desired level. L.E.D. on display will light from left to right for increased water flow. (e.g. 20-40-60-80-100% levels)
  5. To increase flow rate, press the “Ice Cube” button again, as needed, to adjust to the desired flow rate.
  6. To reset Speed Control setting: press “Ice Cube” until the surgeon cooling system stops; restart by pressing “Ice Cube” again until correct setting is indicated.

Relief From Heat While Performing Surgery

Surgeons have been impacted by excessive heat surrounding their bodies due to stress and other environmental factors. For example, neurosurgeons are required to wear appropriate radiation protective shielding (lead aprons, thyroid collars, lead glasses) while using imaging technology to protect them from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The use of these protective garments in addition to scrubs and surgical gowns can significantly increase the surgeon’s body temperature during surgical procedures. The increase in temperature can result in the surgeon becoming fatigued and perspiring during long surgeries which can reduce their focus and attention, resulting in a decrease in their ability to perform their tasks at the desired level.

Share Your Experiences

Have you experienced an increase in your body temperature while performing complicated surgeries? Interested in learning more? Make sure to check out our post on the Active Cooling Vest System For Surgeons In The OR!

5 Ways To Minimize Your Occupational Radiation Exposure

Minimizing Occupational Exposure

“The ideal dose is the least amount of radiation possible to produce an acceptable image.”

1. Time

Time is one of the three basic safety measures to reduce external radiation exposure. It is important for healthcare personnel to limit the amount of time spent in close proximity to the radiation source when exposure to the radiation source is possible. Reducing the time of an exposure reduces the effective dose (radiation) proportionally. Consequently, the less time you are around the equipment, the smaller your exposure will be.

2. Notification by Radiation Equipment Operator

Before any treatment or procedure, it is the responsibility of the trained and certified radiation equipment operator to notify healthcare personnel in the x-ray or treatment room prior to the activation of radiation producing equipment (RPE).

Any piece of equipment in which x-rays are produced electrically are classified as radiation producing equipment or RPE. These tools are used in a variety of medical applications including radiography, mammography, computed tomography, and fluoroscopy.

3. Fluoroscopic Procedures

Healthcare personnel performing fluoroscopic procedures must ensure that the patient is kept as close as possible to the image intensifier side of the fluoroscopic unit and away from the tube side of the unit. All healthcare personnel involved in the fluoroscopic procedure must stand on the image intensifier side of the fluoroscopic unit, whenever possible, to reduce the radiation exposure. Standing on the the same side as the image intensifier radiation intensity is decreased.

4. Avoid Direct Beam Exposure

Healthcare personnel assisting with radiological procedures must avoid holding the patient manually during a radiographic study due to the risk of direct beam exposure.  Any individual holding or supporting a person during radiation exposure should wear protective gloves and apron with a minimum of 0.25 millimeters lead equivalent. Under no circumstances should individuals holding or supporting a person’s part of their body be directly in the primary beam. Healthcare personnel must avoid exposing any body parts to direct x-ray beam exposure.

5. Utilize Shielding

Whenever possible, appropriate shielding should be used to provide attenuation of the radiation being delivered to the healthcare personnel who are potentially exposed. Healthcare personnel must keep all body parts out of the direct x-ray beam. There are a variety of shielding options available and may include, but are not limited to:

Specific Shielding Applications

Healthcare personnel who may have to stand with their backs exposed to the radiation beam must wear wrap-around aprons to decrease the risk of radiation exposure.

Bone and Bone Marrow Protection

When healthcare personnel are in close proximity to the radiation beam they should wear an appropriate lead or lead equivalent apron of sufficient length to shield the upper legs and protect the long bones and bone marrow from increased doses of radiation.

Thyroid Protection 

Healthcare personnel must wear a thyroid collar to protect the thyroid whenever the likelihood of the procedure places them at a higher risk of increased exposure.

Female Healthcare Personnel 

Female healthcare personnel must protect their breasts from radiation exposure by utilizing an apron that completely covers the area.

Eye protection

Healthcare personnel must shield the lens of the eye by using leaded eyeglasses with wrap-around side shields or leaded face shields to reduce scatter radiation when it is anticipated that increased fluoroscopic time may be necessary.

Limiting Radiation Exposure 

Reducing radiological exposure in healthcare settings is important for both occupational workers as well as patients. The following guidelines are based on the radiation safety principles of time, distance, and shielding. By following these guidelines, you can reduce your occupational exposure to radiation.

 

//www.slideshare.net/UniversalMedicalInc/5-ways-to-minimize-your-occupational-radiation-exposure

 

 

Note: This information included in this post is intended for general reference information only. The information provided is not a substitute for professional advice and should not be relied upon in the absence of such professional advice.

X-Ray Protective Apron Care: 9 Do’s And Don’ts

Proper X-Ray Protective Apron Care and Use

X-ray aprons serve a very specific purpose, to protect and shield you from the potentially harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Shielding, one of the three concepts of basic radiation safety, should always be used when the use of time and distance principles are not possible.

Protective x-ray aprons constructed of lead or a non-lead equivalent are designed to protect the radiosensitive areas of the body when it is necessary for the healthcare worker to be near the source of radiation. Typically, x-ray aprons will offer frontal protection of 0.5 mm lead equivalency. In some instances, wrap-around x-ray aprons are required when medical personnel will have their backs exposed to the radiation source.

By learning the proper way to maintain and care for your x-ray apron, you will ensure that you are properly protected and you will extend the life of the apron. Below are the four do’s and the five don’ts of proper x-ray apron care. After reading this post, you will know how to keep your x-ray apron looking good while also keeping yourself protected against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation.

X-Ray Protective Apron Do’s 

1. Inspect and Check Apron For Defects, Cracks, Creases, and Perforations 

Place the x-ray apron on a flat surface and visually check all the seams as well as the outer and inner covers of x-ray apron for any visible damage. Next, check the belts and fastening devices to confirm that they are in good condition. Lastly, inspect the surface of the apron with your hands to locate any potential lumps, cracks, sagging or separation from the apron seams. If the apron condition appears to be suspect, it should be inspected radiographically. “Rejecting an apron depends on the location, area size and number of flaws. It is best to keep the number of flaws to a minimum¹.”

Note: It is recommended that you follow the manufacturer’s recommendations and/or the state regulations regarding the proper care and use of lead protective equipment. 

2. Clean Regularly

X-ray Aprons should be cleaned daily and deodorized by scrubbing with a soft bristle brush, using cold water and a mild detergent. Completely remove cleaning residue by thoroughly rinsing with clean, cold water.

Apron Cleaning Tips

To ensure x-ray aprons are not damaged while cleaning, follow these helpful tips:

  • Never use products that contain bleach.
  • Do not soak or submerge x-ray apron in water.
  • Do not machine launder, autoclave or dry-clean.
  • Once cleaning is complete, if possible, hang the apron on the designated apron wall rack to air dry.

3. Properly Store X-Ray Aprons

The x-ray apron manufacturer’s recommendation regarding the proper handling and storage of the apron must be strictly observed. When not in use x-ray aprons must be stored on hangers to prevent cracks in the protective lead. If possible, do not store the x-ray apron on a flat surface. Aprons should be hung by the shoulder or on an approved apron hanger. Aprons should never be folded or creased, to avoid damaging the lead. “Cracks in the lead lining can develop at the fold, reducing the useful life of the apron¹.” Hook and loop fasteners must be secured properly to avoid snagging or tearing of fabric, always store apron with fasteners completely secured.

4.  Dispose Of Lead Aprons Properly

X-ray protective aprons that contain lead cannot be disposed of as municipal solid waste. Consequently, they must be disposed of as hazardous waste or recycled. The Environmental Protection Agency encourages recycling and reuse rather than disposal. According to the EPA, if the lead shield or apron can be reused by another business for its intended purpose then it remains a product, therefore it is not classified as waste or hazardous waste. Recycling the lead apron is the preferred method since it keeps the lead out of the landfill and extends the useful life of the lead apron. When recycling is not an option, you can contact a disposal service to properly dispose of the lead material.

X-Ray Protective Apron Don’ts 

5. Sit While Wearing Your Apron

Unless the x-ray apron has been designed specifically for seated procedures, you will want to avoid sitting while wearing your apron. Cracks in the lead lining can develop while wearing the apron if seated. Also, you will want to avoid sitting on the apron for the same reason.

6. Expose Apron To Extreme Temperatures 

To prevent damage to the apron, you will want to avoid exposing your x-ray apron to extreme hot or cold temperatures or to direct sunlight.

7. Lean Against Pointed Objects or Sharp Edges

Avoid storing sharp objects in the pockets. X-ray aprons can become damaged while leaning up against sharp or pointed objects, creating perforations in the lead lining and reducing the attenuating qualities of the lead.

8. Store Aprons Over Chair Backs or Equipment

Laying aprons over a chair back or piece of equipment can create creases in the lead lining and can reduce the useful life of the apron.

9. Fold Aprons

To prevent damage to the lead lining, avoid folding, wadding or creasing your x-ray apron.

Ensure Reliable Performance 

To ensure safe performance, as well as keeping your x-ray apron looking good for years to come, we strongly recommend that each x-ray protective apron is thoroughly inspected upon receipt and at regular intervals and properly stored when not in use.

X-ray aprons should be evaluated every 18-24 months to determine if replacement is needed, depending on the amount of usage and general wear and tear.  If you found this post helpful, please feel free to share this post or our SlideShare presentation with your colleagues.

 

//www.slideshare.net/UniversalMedicalInc/x-ray-protective-apron-care-9-dos-and-donts

 

 

 

 

Radiation Shielding: A Key Radiation Protection Principle

Time, Distance, and Shielding

Time, distance, and shielding are the three basic concepts of radiation protection that apply to all types of ionizing radiation. Shielding simply means having something that will absorb radiation between the source of the radiation and the area to be protected. Radiation shielding is based on the principle of attenuation, which is the gradual loss in intensity of any energy through a medium.

Lead acts as a barrier to reduce a ray’s effect by blocking or bouncing particles through a barrier material.  When X-ray photons interact with matter, the quantity is reduced from the original x-ray beam. Attenuation is the result of interactions between x-ray and matter that include absorption and scatter. Differential absorption increases as kVp decreases. The greater the shielding around a radiation source, the smaller the exposure.

X-Ray And Gamma Rays

X-ray and gamma rays are forms of electromagnetic radiation that occur with higher energy levels than those displayed by ultraviolet or visible light. Thick, dense shielding, such as lead, is necessary to protect against the energy emitted from x-rays. Shielding and x-ray room design is a very important consideration for any healthcare facility that  performs diagnostic and interventional radiology.

The purpose of shielding is to protect the patients (when not being examined), X-Ray department staff, visitors and the general public, as well as the people working near the  X-Ray facility. There are three sources of radiation that must be shielded; scattered or secondary (from the patient), primary (the x-ray beam), and leakage (from the x-ray tube).

Scatter Radiation

Diagnostic x-ray procedures frequently require medical personnel to remain in the exam room where they are subjected to scatter radiation. Lead aprons offer valuable protection from radiation exposure but there are times that a mobile lead radiation barrier is required to provide a full body shielding barrier.

Imaging procedures performed in remote locations, such as operating rooms, cardiac catheterization labs, and special procedure rooms pose an added challenge to protect against radiation exposure. Lead barriers are excellent for imaging procedures using ionizing radiation such as fluoroscopy, x-ray, mammography and CT.

Lead Shielding

The use of shielding provides a barrier between you and the source of the radiation. Some examples of shielding are lead aprons, lead glasses, thyroid shields and portable or mobile lead shields. Mobile lead shields of at least 0.25 mm lead equivalency are recommended to be used by anyone working near the table during fluoroscopy procedures when possible. Remember to follow ALARA “as low as reasonably achievable” guidelines when involved in diagnostic or interventional radiology procedures. Lead garments, lead gloves, thyroid shields, leaded glasses, lead drapes, as well as mobile and stationary lead barriers between the patient and personnel all reduce exposure to scatter radiation.

Questions? Comments? 

If you have any questions regarding the selection of lead barriers or mobile lead shields, please feel free to leave a comment below or connect with us over on our Google+ community page and keep the discussion going!

How To Choose The Right X-Ray Apron Style (Part 3)

Which x-ray apron style is right for you?

X-ray aprons are available in a wide variety of styles to meet the specific needs of medical professionals. Determining which lead x-ray apron style is right for you may seem overwhelming. The selection process can be simplified into several easy steps and in this post we will walk you through the necessary steps to ensure that you find the right x-ray apron as well as the appropriate level of radiation protection. The x-ray selection process can be broken down into three steps: (1) choosing your core material, (2) selecting the type of protection required, and (3) determining the best x-ray apron style for your needs.

Core Materials

In our previous post, How-To Determine Which X-Ray Apron Material Is Right For You, we discussed the three different types of core x-ray apron material options including traditional lead, lead composite, and non-lead. Each core material offers a distinct benefit, traditional lead aprons are the most economical, lead composite aprons provide an average weight savings of 25% compared to traditional lead aprons, and non-lead aprons are the lightest weight option available. Once you have determined the core material you can then choose the type of protection needed.

X-Ray Apron Coverage Protection Options

When selecting the type of radiation protection required for your specific application, it is important to understand the unique benefits each style offers. The three common x-ray apron styles are front protection, front/back protection, and quick-drop. Front protection x-ray aprons are ideal for those who only require front-protection during procedures. X-ray aprons that offer front and back protection are designed for those who circulate and will have their back to the radiation source.  The quick- drop x-ray apron has been designed for those who need to remove the x-ray apron during surgery without breaking the sterile field.

Understanding The Various Style Options

Now that we understand the coverage and protection offered by the three main x-ray apron styles, we can take a closer look into the unique benefits available for each apron style.

Frontal Protection

X-ray aprons offering frontal protection are available with several important features including closure options, back type and frontal aprons designed for specialty applications. Front protection x-ray aprons are available with three different closure types including buckle closure, strap closure (tie style), and velcro closure.

There are several factors you will want to consider when choosing the right x-ray apron back type including apron weight, the length of procedure, and types of procedures performed. There are a variety of x-ray apron back types to choose from including the standard plain back apron, flex back apron, back relief/support apron, and fast wrap aprons. There are several speciality options available including pregnancy aprons (1.00mm Pb equivalency over fetal area) and lap guards, lead aprons with a sewn in thyroid collar, and the quick ship lightweight lead flex guard apron.

Front and Back Protection

There are several options to choose from when looking for front and back protection including full wrap aprons and vest/skirt aprons.  Standard medical x-ray protection levels commonly available  for front/back protection aprons are offered in the following combinations:

Front Protection Pb Equivalent/Back Protection Pb Equivalent

  • 0.50mm/0.25mm
  • 0.35mm/0.25mm
  • 0.25mm/0.25mm

Full Wrap Aprons

Full wrap aprons are available in several styles including full overwrap, special procedure, and tabard styles while providing maximum protection. Full overwrap aprons provide lumbar support which reduces fatigue and upper back stress during long procedures. Vest/skirt aprons create maximum weight distribution between the shoulders and hips which eliminates stress on the upper and lower back.

Full Overwrap Protection 

The full overwrap aprons are secured via velcro straps and provides maximum radiation protection which reduces back fatigue during long procedures.

Special Procedure

Special procedure aprons have velcro seems that allow the sides of the apron to separate when bending or sitting while still maintaining front protection.

 

Tabard Style

The tabard style apron – a tabard was a short coat that men commonly wore during the middle ages – is a sleeveless, single piece apron that has a right shoulder and side velcro closure that allows for easy access.

Vest/Skirt Aprons

Vest/skirt aprons provide greater flexibility to the wearer with regard to sitting, bending, or stooping. The skirt is designed for complete overlap to provide maximum protection. Many of the vest/skirt sizes can be mixed to provide maximum comfort and fit.

Quick Drop X-Ray Apron

The quick-drop apron style is designed to be worn over the scrub suit and under the O.R. gown for quick removal without breaking the sterile field after x-ray procedures are completed. The quick-drop style aprons do not have arm holes and require assistance from a second party when putting it on or removing the apron. Quick-drop aprons are available with velcro criss-cross back flaps that assure easy removal. The Xenolite O.R. Quick-Drop Apron allows for freedom of movement, maximum flexibility, and optimal comfort.

Questions? 

Now that we have reviewed the various benefits of the core materials used in x-ray aprons, the different types of protection, and highlighted some of the main benefits of the different types of apron styles, you should be able to choose the right x-ray apron for your specific needs. If you have any additional questions, feel free to leave a comment below or contact us via live chat on our e-commerce site during normal business hours (M-F 9-5 EST).

9 Study Tips To Help You Learn Human Anatomy

Human Anatomy

Human anatomy courses present a systemic approach to the study of the human body. Many courses will begin with the introduction of anatomical terminology and an overview of the cellular processes and tissue classifications. Students learn about the gross and microscopic anatomy of the following systems: nervous system, musculoskeletal system, circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, integumentary system, urinary system, reproductive system, immune system, lymphatic system and the endocrine system. Human anatomy courses will generally offer a laboratory component that parallels and reinforces concepts through the use of anatomical models, histological slides, skeletal materials and cadaver demonstrations.

1. Study early and frequently

When learning a new subject it is important to keep up with the course material and develop a habit of reviewing your coursework on a daily basis. Repetition is an important factor that will contribute to your overall success, study new and previous material to improve your understanding of the subject matter.

2. Understand your optimal learning style

Are you a visual, auditory or tactile learner. Determine what method works the best for you and develop your study habits based on your preferred learning style.

3. Budget your time

The human body is a complex structure comprised of the nervous system, musculoskeletal system, circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, integumentary system, urinary system, reproductive system, immune system, lymphatic system and the endocrine system. When learning about such a complex structure like the human body it is important to manage your time by setting priorities and planning study sessions. A general rule of thumb is to allocate 90 – 120 minutes for outside study for every 60 minutes spent in the classroom. Similar to establishing a good exercise routine, you will want to establish a study routine throughout the week dedicated to learning the material. Shorter, more frequent study sessions will improve your retention of the material and avoid burnout.

The human brain has about 100,000,000,000 neurons. (100 billion)

4. Create a suitable study space

Creating a good study environment allows you to maximize your learning efficiency. When combined with effective time management, good reading and note taking skills, developing effective test taking strategies, a good study space serves as impetus for productive effort. Depending on your optimal learning style, you will want to recognize which environmental distractions are most likely to interfere with your concentration.

5. Formulate a reading strategy 

Memory is formed by associations, so if you want help remembering things, create associations for yourself. 

Developing a sound reading strategy is crucial to successfully learning the material. Before class make sure to scan the chapter by looking at the headings, terms and figures so that you are aware of the topics and terms that will be discussed during the lecture. Following the lecture, review the chapter and us the the notes taken in class as a guide. Take breaks between reading sections and review the information before moving on to the next session. Make a list of what you need to read and budget out the material in an easy to manage manner, this will prevent you from cramming too much information into one study session. Set goals that are realistic and attainable. Try to follow the SQ3R reading method – Survey, Question, Read, Recite, and Recite.

6. Take detailed notes

The SQ3R reading method can be incorporated into your note taking system. The Cornell Note-Taking System will help improve your note taking and overall study skills. When taking notes during the lecture, record only the essentials or telegraphic sentences. Formulate questions based on the lecture material immediately after class, this will improve retention of the material and also provides study questions for upcoming exams. Recite the answers to your questions in your own words and then reflect on the material. Once you have completed this process, spend ten minutes every week reviewing your previous notes to improve retention and prepare you for exams.

7. Study actively

Active study techniques are important for many reasons, especially when it comes to learning about human anatomy. Learning any complicated subject takes time. Understanding human anatomy involves a number of pre-requisites and drawing from information gained from previous courses. The human brain learns by hearing, seeing, feeling, tasting and detecting motion or kinetic energy. When studying human anatomy you will listen to your professor lecturing, you will read your course material, you will feel the anatomical models, and record the information from lectures, labs and reading. There are a number of active study tips including mnemonics, study cards, memorization that can help you increase material retention. Repetition is essential to learning a complicated subject like human anatomy.

8. Develop effective test taking strategies

Developing effective test strategies is much easier when you have established a sound study routine. When dealing with course material that you are familiar with rather than material you are just learning will improve your overall retention and lead to better performance in exams. Many of the strategies previously discussed will prove to be beneficial leading up to your exam.
9. Use all resources available to you  

It is important to properly manage your resources just as you manage your time. Use all the class time available, don’t leave early. Utilize open lab periods to expand and test your knowledge. By taking good notes and asking good questions you will be able to work with your instructors on any issues you may have, hopefully long before the exam. If your school has anatomical models in the classroom, lab or library make sure to take advantage of those resources to help you master the material, 90% of what you remember is based on what you do. Create a study group of fellow students to review the material and develop study questions based on important topics.

Summary 

Learning human anatomy is difficult and it will take a considerable amount of time and dedication. As mentioned earlier you should expect to invest 10-12 hours per week studying anatomy outside of class, including weeks after breaks. Human anatomy courses are largely based on memorization, both visual (cadavers, 3D anatomical models, anatomical charts) and definitions. There is also a critical thinking component where you will need to be able to identify a part of the anatomy based upon clues. As stated before, repetition and developing sound study techniques will provide you the framework for success in learning human anatomy.

6 Anatomical Models For Setting Up Your Physical Therapy Anatomy Laboratory

In physical therapy, it’s important for medical staff to fully understand the human anatomy and how it works. Did you know the brain processes visual information 60,000 faster than text? For learning purposes, anatomical models are an excellent tool to use.

So what type of anatomical models will help set up your physical therapy anatomy laboratory? We’ve listed a few top anatomical models used for physical therapy training and applications.

  1. Lifting Demonstration Figure: Provide your clients with a graphic demonstration of the effects of correct and incorrect lifting techniques on the spine.
  2. Shoulder Joint with Rotator Cuff 5-Part: This model shows the musculature of the rotator cuff and the origin and insertion points of the shoulder muscles.
  3. Muscled Knee Joint Model: Included with this model is an educational card, this model is articulating the right knee with ligaments: meniscus, fibular collateral, tibial collateral, anterior and posterior cruciate and patellar ligament with patella.
  4. Functional Elbow Joint Model: This model provides an excellent graphic demonstration of the anatomy and mechanics of the joint, allowing better doctor-patient or teacher-student understanding.
  5. Hip Joint with Removable Muscles 7-Part: For educational purposes, the origin and insertion areas of the muscles have been raised and presented in color on the hip joint.
  6. Functional Model of the Knee Joint: In this model, the ligaments flexibility allows an excellent demonstration of the full range of motion, including flexion, extension, inner and outer rotation.

For a full list of joint anatomy models and other anatomical models for setting up your physical therapy laboratory, be sure to visit our anatomical model category on our website.

Why Medical Training Models Are Essential For Medical Students

Medical training models are common for teaching medical students certain medical applications and procedures. Anatomical models and simulators will help guide students in learning the process of a procedure, while increasing their comfort level with the application. Medical training models not only provide the student with hands-on practice, it gives the student a visual to apply real life situations instead of reading about it via books and slides.

We have a variety of models and simulators to choose from, such as CPR simulators, medical patient simulators, IV training models, real baby care dolls, and more! Our I.V. Injection Arm Model is unique in that it allows a realistic training to teach competence to medical staff. This model is also great for group instructors because of its high quality, stain resistance and easy to clean material. Many instructors use this model for the following training:

  • Intravenous injections
  • Correct puncture of peripheral veins for blood sampling. The following veins can be punctured: basilic vein, cephalic vein, median cubital vein, dorsal venous rete of hand
  • Positioning of a venous catheter

Another popular medical training model is our Basic Billy Basic Life Support Simulator. This simulator is used to teach students CPR techniques focusing on the depth and force of compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiac failure is one of the leading causes of death and with this medical training model, it shows how easy it is to provide help and save lives through correct CPR techniques.

Are you currently using any medical training models in your facility?