The New Universal Medical eCommerce Site Is Coming Soon

We’re excited to announce that in the coming weeks, we’ll be launching our newly redesigned Universal Medical online store, revamping familiar features and introducing new ones. In this post, we’ll share some of the details of the new UniversalMedicalInc.com and how it will improve your overall shopping experience.

So what’s new?

A Cleaner, Bolder, And More Modern Design

Over the past several months, we’ve been working hard to bring you a mobile-friendly site that is faster, easier to navigate and more user-friendly. We can all agree that technology moves fast. And to keep up, we’ve redesigned the site from the ground up with a clean and modern design that provides you with an optimal viewing experience across a wide range of devices. We want you to enjoy your shopping experience across all your devices (from desktop monitors to mobile phones and tablets).

What should I expect?

A Faster and Easier Site to Navigate

If you’ve been a customer of ours for a while, you’ll immediately notice the new design of our Homepage. We’ve revamped our Homepage by making it simpler and easier for you to navigate. With the newly designed site, you’ll be able to find the products you’ve been searching for quickly and easily. Additionally, we’ve enhanced the site search functionality to quickly provide you with relevant products related to your initial search query.

Richer Visuals

Redesigned Logo

One of the first changes you’ll probably notice is the updated Universal Medical logo. We’ve kept the core elements of our logo and made a few minor tweaks to the typography to reflect the clean and modern design of our new site.

Improved Site Search

Another improvement we are really excited about is the search bar. You’ll immediately notice the new location of the search bar, previously, the smaller search bar was located in the upper right corner, now the larger search bar takes center stage, making it much more accessible. Additionally, you’ll no longer have to click away from the Homepage to see the search results. And last but certainly not least, the search results have become visual. Immediately after you start typing, products will begin to display on the search bar drop-down menu – no more clicking away from the Homepage to see your search results – making it faster and easier to find what you’re looking for on our site.

Stay Tuned for Even More Features to Come

There are many more features that we didn’t discuss in this post, as we approach launch day we’ll be rolling out more information. We couldn’t be more excited about our newly redesigned site and how it will make shopping faster, easier, and more enjoyable for our customers. Keep an eye on your inbox for our pre-launch and launch day notification emails. We look forward to having you check out the New Universal Medical eCommerce site.

Avoiding Retained Surgical Items In The OR

Avoiding Serious Reportable Events (“Never Events”) In The OR

Retained Surgical Items (RSI) are included in the National Quality Forum’s list of Serious Reportable Events (commonly referred to as “Never Events”) as a, “foreign object unintentionally retained after surgery.” The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will no longer pay the extra cost of treating the following categories of conditions that occur while the patient is in the hospital. (Section 5001(c) of the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) of 2005).

  • pressure ulcer stages III and IV;
  • falls and trauma;
  • surgical site infection after bariatric surgery for obesity, certain orthopedic procedures, and bypass surgery (mediastinitis)
  • vascular-catheter associated infection;
  • administration of incompatible blood;
  • air embolism; and
  • foreign object unintentionally retained after surgery 

The National Quality Forum (NQF) defines Never Events as errors in medical care that are of concern to both the public and health care professionals and providers, clearly identifiable and measurable (and thus feasible to include in a reporting system), and of a nature such that the risk of occurrence is significantly influenced by the policies and procedures if the health care organization.

Nothing Left Behind: A National Surgical Patient-Safety Project To Prevent Retained Surgical Items

The site www.nothingleftbehind.org is an educational resource that was started in October 2004 to work with multiple healthcare stakeholder to make sure Retained Surgical Items (RSI) become a true “never” event. The categorical classification of “foreign object unintentionally retained after surgery” may include swallowed pennies, pins, shrapnel, bullets and other objects while surgical items are the tools and materials that we use in procedures to heal not to harm¹.

Patient Safety Problem 

“More than a dozen times a day, doctors sew up patients with sponges and other supplies mistakenly left inside. The mistake can cost some victims their lives².” Although there is no federal reporting requirement, research studies and government data suggests that there are between 4,500 and 6,000 retained surgical items left in patients every year in the United States. “That’s up to twice government estimates, which run closer to 3,000 cases, and sponges account for more than two-thirds of all incidents².”

Simple Solution? 

According to Atul Gawande, a Harvard public health professor and surgeon at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, “It’s a recurrent, persistent and nearly totally avoidable problem…There are technologies that reduce the risk, that actually reduce the overall cost (to hospitals and insurer), and yet they are not the standard. That, to me, is the shocking thing.”

Sponge-Tracking Technology

Research shows that sponges account for 67% of all surgical items mistakenly left in patients². Data complied by Medicare estimates the cost of hospitalizations involving a lost sponge or instrument at more than $60,000 per case, according to USA Today.

Why have so few hospitals adopted systems to prevent lost sponge incidences?

A USA Today survey of companies that manufacture the sponge-tracking technology found that fewer than 15% of U.S. hospitals use sponges equipped with tracking devices, which reduce the risk of leaving a sponge in a patient, that add an additional cost $8 to $12 per surgery.

Barcodes and X-Rays at U-M

Surgeons at the University of Michigan Health System created a system to prevent retained surgical items. “In its effort to be the safest hospital in the country, the U-M uses new technology to insure no objects are left behind in surgery³.” According to Ella Kazerooni, M.D., M.S., professor of radiology at the U-M and associate chair of clinical affairs at the U-M Health System, “Having a foreign object left behind during surgery is something we consider a ‘never event’. It’s something that should never happen³.”

Methods Put Into Practice

  • Bar-coded sponges – sponges have been bar-coded so that they can be scanned when they are used and again when they are taken out of the body. Computers assist the medical staff in counting and if there is a count discrepancy they will know to search the surgical field. (Bar-coded sponges also contain a radiopaque tag)
  • Electronic radiology orders – X-rays are used to find retained items while the patient is still in the OR.

“RSIs can be discovered hours to years after the initial operation and a second operation may be required for removal¹.” According to Dr.Gibbs, author of the Nothing Left Behind site (educational resource), “New ways of thinking about human error and OR practices and understanding systemic changes in OR culture are required to prevent this event. System fixes require knowledge and information, a winning strategy, consistent multi-stakeholder engagement and leadership¹.”

Preventing Future Problems

According to the Institute of Medicine, “the problem is not bad people; the problem is that the system needs to be made safer.” Some hospitals have required four counts of sponges and instruments to improve the system and reduce the number or accidents; while careful counting could prevent some mistakes, counting carries its own risks. Human error can play a major role in RSI incidences, as a majority of the cases of RSI occur under a reported correct count.

Takeaways

  • Bar coding technology can be used to improve counting and tracking sponges in the OR
  • Bar coded sponge management systems are cost-effective
  • Sponge tracking systems are part of a growing trend in which bar coding is utilized to improve the management of medical supplies, equipment and tools throughout the hospital

 

Resources: 

1. Nothing Left Behind: A National Surgical Patient Safety Project To Prevent Retained Surgical Items

//www.nothingleftbehind.org/

2. Eisler, Peter. “What Surgeons Leave behind Costs Some Patients Dearly.”USA Today. Gannett, 08 Mar. 2013. Web. 10 Sept. 2014.

//www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/03/08/surgery-sponges-lost-supplies-patients-fatal-risk/1969603/

3. “University of Michigan Health System Creates System to Prevent Retained Surgical Items.” Web log post. University of Michigan. N.p., 06 Feb. 2012. Web. 10 Sept. 2014.

//www.uofmhealth.org/news/retained-surgical-items-0206

5 Ways To Minimize Your Occupational Radiation Exposure

Minimizing Occupational Exposure

“The ideal dose is the least amount of radiation possible to produce an acceptable image.”

1. Time

Time is one of the three basic safety measures to reduce external radiation exposure. It is important for healthcare personnel to limit the amount of time spent in close proximity to the radiation source when exposure to the radiation source is possible. Reducing the time of an exposure reduces the effective dose (radiation) proportionally. Consequently, the less time you are around the equipment, the smaller your exposure will be.

2. Notification by Radiation Equipment Operator

Before any treatment or procedure, it is the responsibility of the trained and certified radiation equipment operator to notify healthcare personnel in the x-ray or treatment room prior to the activation of radiation producing equipment (RPE).

Any piece of equipment in which x-rays are produced electrically are classified as radiation producing equipment or RPE. These tools are used in a variety of medical applications including radiography, mammography, computed tomography, and fluoroscopy.

3. Fluoroscopic Procedures

Healthcare personnel performing fluoroscopic procedures must ensure that the patient is kept as close as possible to the image intensifier side of the fluoroscopic unit and away from the tube side of the unit. All healthcare personnel involved in the fluoroscopic procedure must stand on the image intensifier side of the fluoroscopic unit, whenever possible, to reduce the radiation exposure. Standing on the the same side as the image intensifier radiation intensity is decreased.

4. Avoid Direct Beam Exposure

Healthcare personnel assisting with radiological procedures must avoid holding the patient manually during a radiographic study due to the risk of direct beam exposure.  Any individual holding or supporting a person during radiation exposure should wear protective gloves and apron with a minimum of 0.25 millimeters lead equivalent. Under no circumstances should individuals holding or supporting a person’s part of their body be directly in the primary beam. Healthcare personnel must avoid exposing any body parts to direct x-ray beam exposure.

5. Utilize Shielding

Whenever possible, appropriate shielding should be used to provide attenuation of the radiation being delivered to the healthcare personnel who are potentially exposed. Healthcare personnel must keep all body parts out of the direct x-ray beam. There are a variety of shielding options available and may include, but are not limited to:

Specific Shielding Applications

Healthcare personnel who may have to stand with their backs exposed to the radiation beam must wear wrap-around aprons to decrease the risk of radiation exposure.

Bone and Bone Marrow Protection

When healthcare personnel are in close proximity to the radiation beam they should wear an appropriate lead or lead equivalent apron of sufficient length to shield the upper legs and protect the long bones and bone marrow from increased doses of radiation.

Thyroid Protection 

Healthcare personnel must wear a thyroid collar to protect the thyroid whenever the likelihood of the procedure places them at a higher risk of increased exposure.

Female Healthcare Personnel 

Female healthcare personnel must protect their breasts from radiation exposure by utilizing an apron that completely covers the area.

Eye protection

Healthcare personnel must shield the lens of the eye by using leaded eyeglasses with wrap-around side shields or leaded face shields to reduce scatter radiation when it is anticipated that increased fluoroscopic time may be necessary.

Limiting Radiation Exposure 

Reducing radiological exposure in healthcare settings is important for both occupational workers as well as patients. The following guidelines are based on the radiation safety principles of time, distance, and shielding. By following these guidelines, you can reduce your occupational exposure to radiation.

 

//www.slideshare.net/UniversalMedicalInc/5-ways-to-minimize-your-occupational-radiation-exposure

 

 

Note: This information included in this post is intended for general reference information only. The information provided is not a substitute for professional advice and should not be relied upon in the absence of such professional advice.

X-Ray Protective Apron Care: 9 Do’s And Don’ts

Proper X-Ray Protective Apron Care and Use

X-ray aprons serve a very specific purpose, to protect and shield you from the potentially harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Shielding, one of the three concepts of basic radiation safety, should always be used when the use of time and distance principles are not possible.

Protective x-ray aprons constructed of lead or a non-lead equivalent are designed to protect the radiosensitive areas of the body when it is necessary for the healthcare worker to be near the source of radiation. Typically, x-ray aprons will offer frontal protection of 0.5 mm lead equivalency. In some instances, wrap-around x-ray aprons are required when medical personnel will have their backs exposed to the radiation source.

By learning the proper way to maintain and care for your x-ray apron, you will ensure that you are properly protected and you will extend the life of the apron. Below are the four do’s and the five don’ts of proper x-ray apron care. After reading this post, you will know how to keep your x-ray apron looking good while also keeping yourself protected against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation.

X-Ray Protective Apron Do’s 

1. Inspect and Check Apron For Defects, Cracks, Creases, and Perforations 

Place the x-ray apron on a flat surface and visually check all the seams as well as the outer and inner covers of x-ray apron for any visible damage. Next, check the belts and fastening devices to confirm that they are in good condition. Lastly, inspect the surface of the apron with your hands to locate any potential lumps, cracks, sagging or separation from the apron seams. If the apron condition appears to be suspect, it should be inspected radiographically. “Rejecting an apron depends on the location, area size and number of flaws. It is best to keep the number of flaws to a minimum¹.”

Note: It is recommended that you follow the manufacturer’s recommendations and/or the state regulations regarding the proper care and use of lead protective equipment. 

2. Clean Regularly

X-ray Aprons should be cleaned daily and deodorized by scrubbing with a soft bristle brush, using cold water and a mild detergent. Completely remove cleaning residue by thoroughly rinsing with clean, cold water.

Apron Cleaning Tips

To ensure x-ray aprons are not damaged while cleaning, follow these helpful tips:

  • Never use products that contain bleach.
  • Do not soak or submerge x-ray apron in water.
  • Do not machine launder, autoclave or dry-clean.
  • Once cleaning is complete, if possible, hang the apron on the designated apron wall rack to air dry.

3. Properly Store X-Ray Aprons

The x-ray apron manufacturer’s recommendation regarding the proper handling and storage of the apron must be strictly observed. When not in use x-ray aprons must be stored on hangers to prevent cracks in the protective lead. If possible, do not store the x-ray apron on a flat surface. Aprons should be hung by the shoulder or on an approved apron hanger. Aprons should never be folded or creased, to avoid damaging the lead. “Cracks in the lead lining can develop at the fold, reducing the useful life of the apron¹.” Hook and loop fasteners must be secured properly to avoid snagging or tearing of fabric, always store apron with fasteners completely secured.

4.  Dispose Of Lead Aprons Properly

X-ray protective aprons that contain lead cannot be disposed of as municipal solid waste. Consequently, they must be disposed of as hazardous waste or recycled. The Environmental Protection Agency encourages recycling and reuse rather than disposal. According to the EPA, if the lead shield or apron can be reused by another business for its intended purpose then it remains a product, therefore it is not classified as waste or hazardous waste. Recycling the lead apron is the preferred method since it keeps the lead out of the landfill and extends the useful life of the lead apron. When recycling is not an option, you can contact a disposal service to properly dispose of the lead material.

X-Ray Protective Apron Don’ts 

5. Sit While Wearing Your Apron

Unless the x-ray apron has been designed specifically for seated procedures, you will want to avoid sitting while wearing your apron. Cracks in the lead lining can develop while wearing the apron if seated. Also, you will want to avoid sitting on the apron for the same reason.

6. Expose Apron To Extreme Temperatures 

To prevent damage to the apron, you will want to avoid exposing your x-ray apron to extreme hot or cold temperatures or to direct sunlight.

7. Lean Against Pointed Objects or Sharp Edges

Avoid storing sharp objects in the pockets. X-ray aprons can become damaged while leaning up against sharp or pointed objects, creating perforations in the lead lining and reducing the attenuating qualities of the lead.

8. Store Aprons Over Chair Backs or Equipment

Laying aprons over a chair back or piece of equipment can create creases in the lead lining and can reduce the useful life of the apron.

9. Fold Aprons

To prevent damage to the lead lining, avoid folding, wadding or creasing your x-ray apron.

Ensure Reliable Performance 

To ensure safe performance, as well as keeping your x-ray apron looking good for years to come, we strongly recommend that each x-ray protective apron is thoroughly inspected upon receipt and at regular intervals and properly stored when not in use.

X-ray aprons should be evaluated every 18-24 months to determine if replacement is needed, depending on the amount of usage and general wear and tear.  If you found this post helpful, please feel free to share this post or our SlideShare presentation with your colleagues.

 

//www.slideshare.net/UniversalMedicalInc/x-ray-protective-apron-care-9-dos-and-donts

 

 

 

 

Radiation Shielding: A Key Radiation Protection Principle

Time, Distance, and Shielding

Time, distance, and shielding are the three basic concepts of radiation protection that apply to all types of ionizing radiation. Shielding simply means having something that will absorb radiation between the source of the radiation and the area to be protected. Radiation shielding is based on the principle of attenuation, which is the gradual loss in intensity of any energy through a medium.

Lead acts as a barrier to reduce a ray’s effect by blocking or bouncing particles through a barrier material.  When X-ray photons interact with matter, the quantity is reduced from the original x-ray beam. Attenuation is the result of interactions between x-ray and matter that include absorption and scatter. Differential absorption increases as kVp decreases. The greater the shielding around a radiation source, the smaller the exposure.

X-Ray And Gamma Rays

X-ray and gamma rays are forms of electromagnetic radiation that occur with higher energy levels than those displayed by ultraviolet or visible light. Thick, dense shielding, such as lead, is necessary to protect against the energy emitted from x-rays. Shielding and x-ray room design is a very important consideration for any healthcare facility that  performs diagnostic and interventional radiology.

The purpose of shielding is to protect the patients (when not being examined), X-Ray department staff, visitors and the general public, as well as the people working near the  X-Ray facility. There are three sources of radiation that must be shielded; scattered or secondary (from the patient), primary (the x-ray beam), and leakage (from the x-ray tube).

Scatter Radiation

Diagnostic x-ray procedures frequently require medical personnel to remain in the exam room where they are subjected to scatter radiation. Lead aprons offer valuable protection from radiation exposure but there are times that a mobile lead radiation barrier is required to provide a full body shielding barrier.

Imaging procedures performed in remote locations, such as operating rooms, cardiac catheterization labs, and special procedure rooms pose an added challenge to protect against radiation exposure. Lead barriers are excellent for imaging procedures using ionizing radiation such as fluoroscopy, x-ray, mammography and CT.

Lead Shielding

The use of shielding provides a barrier between you and the source of the radiation. Some examples of shielding are lead aprons, lead glasses, thyroid shields and portable or mobile lead shields. Mobile lead shields of at least 0.25 mm lead equivalency are recommended to be used by anyone working near the table during fluoroscopy procedures when possible. Remember to follow ALARA “as low as reasonably achievable” guidelines when involved in diagnostic or interventional radiology procedures. Lead garments, lead gloves, thyroid shields, leaded glasses, lead drapes, as well as mobile and stationary lead barriers between the patient and personnel all reduce exposure to scatter radiation.

Questions? Comments? 

If you have any questions regarding the selection of lead barriers or mobile lead shields, please feel free to leave a comment below or connect with us over on our Google+ community page and keep the discussion going!

How To Choose The Right Disposable Shoe Covers

Disposable shoe covers fall under the category of PPE or personal protective equipment. The World Health Organization states that using personal protective equipment provides a physical barrier between micro-organisms and the wearer. It offers protection by helping prevent microorganisms from contaminating hands, eyes, clothing, hair, and shoes. PPE also helps prevent micro-organisms from being transmitted to other patients and staff. It is important to remember that personal protective equipment reduces but does not completely eliminate the risk of acquiring an infection.

In the World Health Organization publication “Practical Guidelines for Infection Control in Health Care Facilities” it states that disposable shoe covers should be worn where there is the likelihood the patient’s blood, bodily fluids, secretions or excretions may splash, spill or leak onto the hair or shoes. Disposable shoe covers should not be reused and should be discarded according to the healthcare facility protocol.

When selecting a disposable shoe cover you will want to consider the material, type of seam and application. When selecting disposable shoe covers there are several material options available to choose from including all film CPE (Chlorinated Polyethylene), SureGrip™, GenPro®, and AquaTrak®.

Material Properties & Applications

  • The CPE shoe covers are heat sealed, seamless and offer excellent fluid resistant and provide great dry surface traction. These non-particulate, non-conductive disposable shoe covers are ideal for critical environments by reducing the potential of contamination upon entering work areas.
  • The SureGrip™ shoe cover exhibits excellent anti-skid properties and is simply the best material for damp and dry conditions. These disposable shoe covers have an ultra low particulate count and exhibit excellent anti-skid properties without adding any extra material to the sole that could add to contamination concerns.
  • The AquaTrak® material provides excellent protection in both wet and dry conditions, this material was designed specifically for superior performance in wet conditions. The anti-skid properties provide amazing slip and fall protection without any additional coatings. These boot covers provide the user a breathable and comfortable PPE solution.

Seam Types

  • Serged Seams are produced when the threads are interlocked around the material edges for a strong stress-resistant seam.
  • Heat-Sealed Seams are strong and creates an impervious seam when ultra-sonic welding is incompatible with the shoe or boot cover material.
  • Ultrasonically Welded Seam are created without thread holes and is welded together creating a superior particle and fluid barrier.
  • Tunneled Elastic Seam design provides a secure closure for the shoe or boot cover and helps limit the particle and fluid contamination.
Product NameMaterial Seam TypeColorFeatures
CPE All-Film Shoe CoversCPEHeat Sealed Seams Blue Seamless Sole, Lightweight, Non-Conductive, Fluid Resistant, Latex-Free
SureGrip Serged Seam Shoe CoversSureGripSerged SeamsBlueAnti-Skid Properties, Fluid Impervious Material, Ultra Low Particulate Counts, Wet & Dry Environments
AquaTrak Sonic Welded Seamless Sole Ankle High Boot CoversAquaTrakSonic WeldedBlueProtects In Wet & Dry Conditions (Advanced Material), Anti-Skid, Fluid Impervious, Sonic Welded Seamless Soles, High Breathability, Low Particulate Counts, Tunneled Elastic Top

When it comes to selecting the right disposable shoe covers it is important to understand the various qualities of the materials and which one is right for your specific application. The CPE film disposable shoe covers are perfect for many applications where value and transition are required. The SureGrip disposable shoe covers have been proven themselves as the shoe cover of choice for a wide range of floor surfaces in different applications while providing you with high performance and overall value. The GenPro disposable shoe covers are excellent for facility visitors for non-hazardous environments, these covers provide a moderate barrier to fluids, particulates, and contamination. If you have any further questions feel free to contact us directly for more information or leave a comment below.

Season’s Greetings & Happy Holidays From Universal Medical

Happy Holidays from all of us at Universal Medical. On behalf of the whole Universal Medical team we would like to send you a very big thank you this holiday season! We appreciate your business and we look forward to serving you in 2014! Sending you best wishes for a happy and healthy new year!

//universalmedicalinc.wistia.com/medias/cugaj0ha09?embedType=iframe&videoFoam=true&videoWidth=360

Determining Electroporation Cuvette Gap Size

In our last post on electroporation we discussed the basics of electroporation. The focus of this post will be on determining the correct gap size for electroporation cuvettes. Electroporation cuvettes are disposable cuvettes with aluminum electrodes for the electroporation of eukaryotic cells, bacteria, and yeasts. Electroporation cuvettes are generally available in three different sizes with gap sizes or gap widths of 1mm, 2mm, 4mm. The electroporation cuvettes are sterilized with gamma radiation and are individually wrapped to guarantee sterility. Disposable electroporation cuvettes help save time and eliminate the possibility of carryover contamination. The cuvettes are available in three different sizes with filling volumes of 100 µl  microliters for the white capped 1 mm gap size, 400 µl microliters for the blue capped 2 mm gap size, and 800 µl  microliters for the red capped 4 mm  gap size electroporation cuvette.

Electroporation Cuvette DescriptionGap Width Filling Volume μl (microliters)Cell Types
1 mm Gap Sterile Electroporation Cuvette1 mm (White Cap)100 μl Bacteria
2 mm Gap Sterile Electroporation Cuvette2 mm (Blue Cap)400 μl Yeast
4 mm Gap Sterile Electroporation Cuvette4 mm (Red Cap)800 μl Mammalian Cells

The gap size is the distance between the electrodes and is important when optimizing your electroporation experiment. Gap size is used when determining the field strength (kV)  by using the formula of voltage divided by gap size (cm). If the desired field strength and gap size is known you can also determine what the appropriate voltage would be required to successfully perform the experiment. 

Optimization for electroporation takes many different factors into consideration and determining the cuvette gap size is only one consideration of optimizing the experiment. We will be discussing other optimizations in upcoming posts next year so be sure to subscribe to our blog to stay informed with new updates.

Featured Product: FlexHold Quad Universal Glove/Mask Box Holder

Looking for a glove box holder that can hold different sized boxes? The FlexHold Quad Glove/Mask Box Holder was designed to hold various sized and types of PPE supplies. Many glove box dispensers and holders in the industry can only accommodate certain sized boxes, but this unique design can hold various sizes making it easier to purchase glove and mask boxes.

The adjustable holding points give you the true flexibility to hold up to four different boxed protective products and other lab essentials (size dependent). Ideal for holding different boxed sizes of gloves, mop caps, ear defenders, face masks, shoe covers etc. Displaying glove and mask box holders throughout your medical facility is essential to increase the use of certain PPE supplies. 

Features:

  • Holds any box size
  • Holds 1 to 4 boxes
  • Adjustable universal fit
  • Easy to clean
  • Wall-or door-mountable
  • Low profile wall mount
  • Mounting hardware included
  • Made in USA
  • Unit Measures: 6″ W x 30″ H x 3″ D

//universalmedicalinc.wistia.com/medias/43fbcp73ar

Have any questions or comments about this featured product? Make sure to let us know in the comment box below.

Weekly Wrap For December 9 – December 13, 2013

What Is Electroporation?

Electroporation is the application of an electric current to a living surface (as the skin or a cell membrane) in order to open pores or channels through which something (as a drug or DNA) may pass.  Electroporation or electropermeabilization is usually used in molecular biology as a way of introducing some substance into a cell, such as loading it with a molecular probe, a drug that can change a cell’s function, or a piece of coding DNA.

Freezing Tissue For Frozen Section Diagnosis

When performing a frozen section procedure (also known as cryosection), it’s important to use the appropriate tools and chemicals. Throughout this process an aerosol refrigerant is sprayed to freeze the sample and expedite the freezing process. Frozen section procedures are referred to as pathological laboratory procedures that performed often in oncological surgery.

Whiteboard Wednesday: The Benefits Of Wearing Exam Gloves

This week’s Whiteboard Wednesday we highlight the benefits of wearing medical exam gloves in your facility! Exam gloves are ideal for many reasons, protecting hands from infection and germs, keeping in line with infection control standards, being able to use them in many different types of  procedures and applications, etc.

Featured Product: Chemo Sharps Container

A needlestick from a contaminated sharp has the possibility of leaving a worker infected with HIV, HBV, HCV and other dangerous pathogens. It’s important to appropriately discard sharps in your facility’s designated sharps containers. When selecting sharps containers it’s good to know the type of waste your facility has to discard, the storage area and space limitations and your facility’s state and federal regulations.

Just In Time For The New Year – 2014 Year Labels!

Looking to start 2014 off with an organized office or department? We have a variety of 2014 year labels that will help maintain organization and efficiency in your medical office.