Evaluating Microorganism Levels On X-Ray Aprons And Lead Wearables: The Science Of ATP Testing

How Have Microorganisms and Bioburden Been Measured?

In the previous blog post regarding X-Ray lead aprons, we explored the history of healthcare associated infections or HAIs, and how transmission risks are posed to patients and staff via contaminated “high touch, non-critical surfaces,” including X-Ray aprons and protective lead wearables.  In laying out the content of this blog, I was reminded of the phrases, “things aren’t always as they appear” and “don’t judge a book by its cover.” Is it possible that newer (clean looking) X-Ray aprons can carry a higher level of biological contamination when tested in comparison to older X-Ray aprons (which are dirty looking & smelling)? It is completely possible and plausible due to the concept of bioburden.

What is Bioburden?

Bioburden is defined in numerous medical dictionaries as the number of microorganisms contaminating an object.  So how does one assess for bioburden?  The gold standard for assessing for bacterial/fungal contamination has been to assess for colony forming units or CFUs.  A CFU equals one viable bacterium that has the ability to spread and replicate.

3 Main Ways to Measure CFUs: 

  1. A scientist could dilute the sample and count the bacteria by microscopic examination or through the use of a cell counter.  However, if bacteria are too small or clump together, then this method is problematic.  This method will yield total bacteria counts, both living and dead.
  2. A scientist could use Optical Density (OD) to estimate the number of viable bacteria in a sample.  This is where the scientist measures how cloudy a liquid culture of bacteria is.  While the bacteria are actively growing the liquid culture should continually become more and more cloudy.  Again, this method will yield total bacteria counts, both living and dead.
  3. A scientist could make serial dilutions of a liquid culture and plate out the bacteria in known dilutions until they can count single colonies and extrapolate back to figure out total CFU in a sample. This method only yields viable bacteria totals.

4 Challenges Associated with Bioburden Assessment

Assessing for bioburden (microorganisms) by calculating CFUs is not as easy or straight forward as one might imagine.

  1. The first challenge posed is that one needs to have a lab in which to grow bacteria, and depending on the bacteria one is dealing with there are different governmental regulations to follow.
  2. The second challenge presented is that of time, one needs to have the time and equipment to properly grow the bacteria/fungus.  Different species of bacteria or fungus grow at different rates, for example, culturing of bacteria on plates can take anywhere from overnight to multiple days.
  3. A third and very important challenge is posed by the bacteria and fungus themselves.  They are similar to people in the fact that not all of them grow and thrive under the same conditions.  In lab work, if only one kind of food source is used, one will only be able to assess for bacteria that grow on that particular food source.
  4. Finally, one needs to have a trained technician who knows how to assess which bacteria to grow under the correct conditions and then also how to properly count the bacteria.

While assessing for CFUs has traditionally been viewed as the gold standard for assessing bioburden, and it is vitally important for various microbial studies, it is not a good way to assess bioburden in real time.  It can be complicated.

What is ATP and How is it Evaluated?

What if there was an easier way to determine surface levels of biological contamination?

What if there was an easier way to assess for a molecule that is found only in living cells, both bacterial and human living cells?

There IS an easier way to evaluate for this molecule in real time (by using a simple swab and handheld reader), and it can be used by any hospital staff member as a surrogate for such complicated CFU work.  Let me introduce you to the molecule known as the “molecular workhorse,” called adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP)

ATP is an energy molecule utilized by cells. It is present in humans, animals, plants and microbial cells.  ATP levels rise as a cell is undergoing apoptosis (programed cell death), but is generally consider to be completely degraded within 30 minutes of cell death (1).  This makes ATP a useful marker for the presence of unwanted biological contamination, including organisms that can cause infection and disease.

Okay – Get to the Point!

An increase in biological cells on a surface results in an increase in the amount of ATP present on that surface, thus making ATP an effective marker for the assessment of the hygienic status of an environmental surface. Simply stated, the amount of ATP present on a testing swab is a quantitative measurement of the cleanliness of the surface tested! In fact, ATP cell viability assays were determined to be the fastest, most sensitive, and least prone to artifacts, partially due to a lack of an incubation period (2).  The sensitivity of laboratory cell based ATP cell viability assays can detect fewer than 10 cells per well (2).  This technology has been modified to create a portable, ATP bioluminescence test, using a swab instead of plated cells.  This now allows for a real time assessment of bioburden on site.  These tests have been used to assess bioburden in many healthcare settings, including the ICU (3).  ATP measuring units, called luminometers, are handheld, user friendly, and display the results in seconds. (It doesn’t take a scientist to use an ATP luminometer!) The read out of an ATP bioluminescence test is not in CFUs, but is in relative light units or RLUs.  In the past, some scientists have questioned the validity of using a bioluminescence test instead of assaying for CFU.

Is There a Correlation Between CFUs & RLUs? 

Like most assessments, ATP bioluminescence assays also have limitations, but they are an excellent surrogate that allows the everyday staff member to assess bioburden in real time.  Those new to ATP bioluminescence testing often inquire about a correlation between CFUs and RLUs.  (Most laboratory microbiologists have the capability to perform CFU testing, and are not confined to real time assessment of bioburden.)  The most controlled way to achieve this is to look at different known amounts of CFUs and assess whether or not the RLUs increase accordingly.  That is exactly what Dr. Sciortino’s group did when they assessed three different portable ATP bioluminescence kits for their ability to detect various CFUs of two different HAI relevant bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii) and one strain of fungus (Candida albicans).

What they discovered was there was a linear relationship between bacterial CFUs and RLUs for all three luminescence kits, and for two of the three kits between fungal CFUs and RLUs (1).  Such research validates that the use of ATP luminometers can be used to assess for bioburden on surfaces in real time.  This research, plus Dr. Jaber’s study, in which 25 lead aprons were cultured for CFUs and showed that 21 were colonized with Tinea species (the family of fungus that causes ringworm) and 21 were colonized with Staphylococcus aureus, of which 3 aprons were colonized with MRSA (4), validates the ATP bioluminescence results for X-ray aprons and protective lead wearables.

In fact, these X-ray aprons and protective lead wearables, which are worn throughout many different areas within a healthcare system, including the operating rooms, cath labs, radiology/imaging areas, emergency rooms and beyond are regularly testing with RLU readings in the THOUSANDS to HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS (5), which is scary. The bottom line is regardless if you are a classically trained microbiologist used to looking at CFUs or a hospital staffer looking at luminometer readouts in RLUs, when surfaces inside an OR or Cath Lab are testing in the hundreds of thousands range, it is a problem!

Is ATP Testing Growing in Use?

Through utilization of ATP luminometer testing systems, companies like Radiological Care Services (Indianapolis) are able to enter a facility’s Cath Lab, OR or Radiology Department and test lead apron inventories on site, providing real time numbers (bioburden levels) in a matter of seconds. An advocate for ATP luminometer testing, Dr. Sciortino even states, “ATP system monitoring may uncover the need for new disinfectant designs that adequately remove hospital surface biofilms, rendering used hospital equipment to its native state whereby a zero reading by ATP monitoring can be achieved” (1).  If you look back at the first blog post, “Contaminated X-Ray Aprons and The Risk of HAIs”, I positioned that “using wipes alone” was insufficient and through the use of ATP testing, Dr. Sciortino could be inferring a similar position.

Looking Ahead…

In the next blog post, we’ll specifically look at the science/methodology behind the use of sanitizing wipes and we’ll further explore the differences between true “cleaning” and “sanitization.” We’ll later examine what the governing bodies, such as AORN, CDC, HFAP and JCAHO state regarding their expectations of such surfaces within healthcare facilities. Understanding the science behind HAIs, testing for biological contaminants on surfaces, biofilms, and the difference between “cleaning” and “sanitization” will help us understand that current healthcare protocols in regards “non-critical, high touch surfaces” need to be changed in order to better protect hospital patients and staff.

About The Author:

Kathleen R. Jones received her BS from Purdue University (West Lafayette) in Biology specializing in Genetics and Microbiology.   After working for five years in Quality Control she then completed her MS at Purdue University in Indianapolis.  Her growing interest in Infectious Diseases lead her to the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences where she obtained a Doctorate in Emerging Infectious Diseases.  Kathleen has a passion for progressive sciences and initiatives, and employs her keen understanding of the biofilm formation and elimination processes into her research and work.

Sources:

  1. Sciortino, C. V. and R. A. Giles.  2012. Validation and comparison of three adenosine triphosphate luminometers for monitoring hospital surface sanitization: A Rosetta Stone for adenosine triphosphate testing.  AJIC.  40 (e233-9)
  2. Riss T.L., R.A. Moravec, A. L. Niles, H.A. Benink, T.J. Worzella, L. Minor. Minor, L, editor.  2013,  Cell Vialblity Assays. In: Sittampalam G.S., N.P. Coussens, H. Nelson, et al., editors. Assay Guidance Manual [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): Eli Lilly & Company and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences; 2004-. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK144065/
  3. Moore, G., D. Smyth, J. Singleton, P. Wilson. 2010. The use of adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence to assess the efficacy of a modified cleaning program implemented within an intensive care setting.  AJIC. 38(8):617-622 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2010.02.011
  4. Jaber, M., M. Harvill, E. Qiao.  2014.  Lead aprons worn by interventional radiologists contain pathogenic organisms including MRSA and tinea species.  Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology.  25:3:S99-S100.  DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvir.2013.12.279
  5. “Outcomes: What do your numbers look like?” Radiological Care Services. Nov 20, 2014. http://www.radcareservices.com/radiolgical-care-services-outcomes.html

Active Cooling Vest System For Surgeons In The OR

What is an active cooling vest? 

A cooling vest is a piece of equipment designed to cool a person down. Cooling vests are used by doctors, athletes, industrial workers, working dogs, individuals with Multiple Sclerosis or hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, race care drivers, and military personnel.

Active cooling vests and systems require some form of power, electricity or battery, to operate. This type of cooling technology provides continuous cooling to lower the body’s core temperature by circulating cold water via a cooler through a tube to the vest.

CoolVest System 

Although cooling vests are used by a variety of people for a variety of uses, the CoolVest System has been designed specifically for surgeons working in the OR. Staying cool in the OR is an important consideration for surgeons, especially when performing pediatric surgeries, burn or trauma cases. The CoolVest System will keep you cool and focused – even when the OR has been warmed to AORN (recommended OR temperature 68-73 Fahrenheit) and Joint Commission Standards. When performing surgical procedures where the surgeon is exerting a great deal of physical effort, body temperatures can easily rise while covered with sterile gowns and lead aprons, not to mention the heat emitted from the OR lights.

CoolVest System Features

  • Lightweight vest made with hospital-grade ventilated nylon for maximum comfort.
  • Variable flow control and quick-dry disconnects for ease-of-use.
  • Choice of styles & sizes from small – XXXL
  • Variable hose lengths for freedom of motion.
  • Up to 70 feet of patented, thin wall, no-kink tubing for use under lead aprons.
  • Low-profile cooling unit for easy storage.
  • Wheeled cart with handle for convenient portability.
  • Single and dual vest capacity.
  • Heavy duty pump system.
  • Limited Lifetime Warranty with Free Loaner Program
  • UL Listing guarantees the highest quality standards for use in the OR.

Single-Surgeon System Includes

  • One premium CoolVest (Small-XXXL)
  • 8 foot insulated supply hose with quick disconnects
  • Protective hose cover
  • T-Drain kit
  • Maintenance additive (16 ounce bottle)
  • Stainless steel cart with hospital grade wheels
  • UL Listed cooler with variable flow 110V pump

A Dual-Surgeon System is also available and comes with two premium CoolVests. 

Remain Alert And Focused

The CoolVest System offers variable flow control, which allows you to regulate the fluid flow to your personal comfort level so that you won’t perspire, suffer fatigue or lose concentration. No matter how long or complex the surgery, you’ll remain alert an focused.

Stay Cool And Comfortable

The lightweight vest is made with hospital-grade ventilated nylon for maximum comfort. Available in sizes ranging from small to XXXL the CoolVest is lightweight, comfortable, and durable for OR conditions. Comfort is essential when working under intense pressure and performing hundreds of high-risk procedures each year. The CoolVest will help surgeons and medical staff stay cool and focused while working in the OR. Make sure to visit our Surgeon Cooling section on our main site for more CoolVest products.

Why Medical Training Models Are Essential For Medical Students

Medical training models are common for teaching medical students certain medical applications and procedures. Anatomical models and simulators will help guide students in learning the process of a procedure, while increasing their comfort level with the application. Medical training models not only provide the student with hands-on practice, it gives the student a visual to apply real life situations instead of reading about it via books and slides.

We have a variety of models and simulators to choose from, such as CPR simulators, medical patient simulators, IV training models, real baby care dolls, and more! Our I.V. Injection Arm Model is unique in that it allows a realistic training to teach competence to medical staff. This model is also great for group instructors because of its high quality, stain resistance and easy to clean material. Many instructors use this model for the following training:

  • Intravenous injections
  • Correct puncture of peripheral veins for blood sampling. The following veins can be punctured: basilic vein, cephalic vein, median cubital vein, dorsal venous rete of hand
  • Positioning of a venous catheter

Another popular medical training model is our Basic Billy Basic Life Support Simulator. This simulator is used to teach students CPR techniques focusing on the depth and force of compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiac failure is one of the leading causes of death and with this medical training model, it shows how easy it is to provide help and save lives through correct CPR techniques.

Are you currently using any medical training models in your facility?

Featured Product: Chemo Sharps Container

 A needlestick from a contaminated sharp has the possibility of leaving a worker infected with HIV, HBV, HCV and other dangerous pathogens. It’s important to appropriately discard sharps in your facility’s designated sharps containers. When selecting sharps containers it’s good to know the type of waste your facility has to discard, the storage area and space limitations and your facility’s state and federal regulations.

Chemo sharps containers are a safe way to dispose of trace chemotherapy, needles, administration sets and medication vials. The 1.5 gallon chemo sharps container is ideal for smaller volume treatment areas and home infusion usage and will help prevent percutaneous injuries and exposure to hazardous materials.

Features:

  • Dimensions: 8″ wide x 4.25″ deep x 11.75″ high
  • Has a liquid absorbent pouch and a gasketed locking screw cap to prevent leakage during disposal or transport
  • Bright yellow color for medical staff to easily identify
  • Unique locking top minimizes the risk of hazards resulting from mishandled, overturned or dropped containers
  • Container can be free standing on a table top or mounted with metal cabinets and stands
  • Puncture resistant walls

Have any questions or comments about our featured product? Let us know in the comment box below!

Whiteboard Wednesday: The Benefits Of Wearing Exam Gloves

This week’s Whiteboard Wednesday we highlight the benefits of wearing medical exam gloves in your facility! Exam gloves are ideal for many reasons, protecting hands from infection and germs, keeping in line with infection control standards, being able to use them in many different types of  procedures and applications, etc.

 

Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel for more Whiteboard Wednesday videos!

Whiteboard Wednesday: What You Should Do After Using PPE Supplies

Today on Whiteboard Wednesday we discuss proper ways to dispose your PPE (personal protection equipment) supplies after use. Properly disposing your PPE supplies in your medical facility is very important for reducing the spread of infection. Be sure to watch our Whiteboard Wednesday video below!

Weekly Wrap For November 18 – November 22, 2013

5 Benefits Of Disposable Patient Positioning Straps

Disposable patient positioning straps are used to assist in immobilizing patients and are great for infection control purposes. Proper patient positioning is critical to patient safety, a durable safety strap is often required for specific positioning techniques. 

Sharps Containers: Preventing Sharps Injuries With Proper Disposal

Sharps injuries are a very serious matter in healthcare facilities. According to the CDC, they estimate that about 385,000 sharps-related injuries occur yearly among medical workers in hospitals. Careful handling of contaminated sharps can reduce the risk of infection for hospital workers.

Whiteboard Wednesday: Types of PPE Supplies

This week's Whiteboard Wednesday, we discuss the different types of PPE supplies! Disposable gowns, face masks, infection control footwear, bouffants, lab coats, etc. are all important PPE supplies to keep in your medical setting.

World Wide Pressure Ulcer Prevention Day – November 21, 2013

We are proud to join the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) in the promotion of World Wide Pressure Ulcer Prevention Day!

“The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel serves as the authoritative voice for improved patient outcomes in pressure ulcer prevention and treatment through public policy, education and research.”

World Wide Pressure Ulcer Prevention Day – November 21, 2013

We are proud to join the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) in the promotion of World Wide Pressure Ulcer Prevention Day!

“The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel serves as the authoritative voice for improved patient outcomes in pressure ulcer prevention and treatment through public policy, education and research.”

The International NPUAP-EPUAP defines pressure ulcer as a “localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear. A number of contributing or confounding factors are also associated with pressure ulcers; the significance of these factors is yet to be elucidated.”

Pressure ulcers or bedsores, are injuries to skin and underlying tissues that result from prolonged pressure on the skin. The development of pressure ulcers most commonly occur on bony areas of the body, such as the heel, ankles, hips, head or buttocks. Individuals who are confined to a bed for prolonged periods, required to use a wheelchair, or have a medical condition that limits them from easily changing positions are the most susceptible to developing pressure ulcers. According to the Mayo Clinic “bedsores can develop quickly and are often difficult to treat.” There are several strategies that can help prevent some bedsores and promote healing.

The NPUAP has categorized and defined (listed below) bedsores into four stages based on their severity. The severity of the pressure ulcer is ranked from stage I, the beginning stage, to stage IV, the most severe, where the ulcer exhibits large-scale tissue loss.

Category/Stage I: Non-Blanchable erythema 

Skin is intact with non-blanchable redness (lighter color skin) or darkly pigmented skin may not have visible blanching of a localized area usually over a bony prominence. “The area may be painful, firm, soft, warmer or cooler as compared to adjacent tissue.”

Category/Stage II: Partial thickness

Partial thickness loss of dermis presenting as a shallow open ulcer with a red pink wound bed, without slough or bruising.

Category/Stage III: Full thickness skin loss

Full thickness tissue loss, bone, tendon and muscle are not exposed but subcutaneous (adipose tissue) fat may be visible. The depth of the ulcer can vary depending on the amount of subcutaneous tissue present in the region.

Category/Stage IV: Full thickness tissue loss  

The most severe stage, full thickness tissue loss with exposed bone, tendon or muscle has occurred.

Common sites of pressure ulcers for people who use a wheelchair develop on the tailbone, shoulder blade, spine, back of arms and legs where they rest against the chair. People confined to beds often develop pressure ulcers on the back or sides of head, rim of the ears, shoulders or shoulder blades, hip, lower back, tailbone, heels, ankles and the skin behind the knees.

Risk factors for developing pressure ulcers include anyone with limited mobility and is unable to easily change positions while seated or in a bed. Immobility may be due to:

  • Generally poor health or weakness
  •  Paralysis
  • Injury or illness that requires bed rest or wheelchair use
  • Recovery after surgery
  • Sedation (surgical procedure)
  • Coma

Relieving pressure from the pressure ulcer site is the first step in treatment. The use of support surfaces (special cushions or pads, mattresses and beds) and patient repositioning can help reduce the pressure on the sore. There are a whole host of treatment options that are available to people with bedsores or pressure ulcers that are out of the scope of this post, so please feel free to visit the NPUAP site for more resources.

The impact of pressure ulcers upon patients and families can be traumatic and life changing, so please help spread the word to help increase awareness of this global challenge that health care providers face on a daily basis. For further information about National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel and pressure ulcers please visit: NPUAP

5 Benefits Of Disposable Patient Positioning Straps

Disposable patient positioning straps are used to assist in immobilizing patients and are great for infection control purposes. Proper patient positioning is critical to patient safety, a durable safety strap is often required for specific positioning techniques. When selecting a patient positioning strap it is important to consider the safety and well-being of the patient during their procedure. By selecting disposable positioning straps like the Disposable Velcro Self Strap Restraint System you will reduce the risk of patient injury and maximize patient safety. Straps made from flexible materials provide a soft, injury reducing form of patient restraint that can be used during all phases of preoperative surgeries. Features of the disposable Velcro self strap restraint system include versatility, residue free adhesion, disposable for infection control, non-metal construction, and latex-free.

Versatile 

The disposable Velcro self strap restraint system comes in a 30′ roll and is easily trimmed to the desired length with ordinary scissors. The Velcro loop is laminated to the hook which makes an automatic self adjusting positioning strap/immobilizer that can be used during any O.R. procedure. This unique hook and loop combination is so versatile that it can be used with any table or surface that does not have side rails.

Residue Free 

The convenient Velcro strap acts like an ordinary roll of tape without the messy adhesive residue. The Velcro strap sticks to itself so you can quickly and easily trim to the desired length to accommodate patients of different sizes. The Velcro hook and loop strap quickly stabilizes the patient thereby minimizing trauma and bruising.

Infection Control

The World Health Organization states that the management of health-care waste is an integral part of hospital hygiene and infection control. “Health-care waste should be considered as a reservoir of pathogenic microorganisms, which can cause contamination and give rise to infection.” According to WHO, the most frequent route of infection transmission is indirect contact. For example, the infected patient touches an object, instrument or surface which then becomes contaminated. Subsequent contact between that item and another patient is likely to contaminate the second individual who then may then develop an infection. By using a disposable Velcro self strap restraint system the risk of indirect infection transmission is almost completely eliminated.

Non-Metallic Construction 

The Velcro self strap restraint system is latex and metal-free which reduces injury to the patient and the staff. Some reusable positioning straps have metal rings or buckles that can reduce the potential for skin cuts, abrasions and welts. The Velcro straps provide a soft and pliable surface which reduces skin irritation and pressure sores.

Latex Free 

Latex is used in a variety of medical products. Medical professionals are at risk since they are frequently exposed to latex products. Hospitals and health care facilities are beginning to create latex-safe treatment areas and surgical suites to accommodate people who are allergic to latex. Some facilities have also set up systems for identification of staff and patients with latex allergy. The disposable Velcro self strap restraint system is latex free and offers an excellent alternative to latex based products.

Proper patient positioning is critical to patient safety. By using a disposable patient positioning strap you add an additional layer of infection prevention. The disposable Velcro self strap restraint system will make a great addition to your medical facility.

 

 

How To Choose The Right Exam Glove Dispenser

Choosing the right exam glove box dispenser is an important step in keeping your medical facility organized and promoting sound infection control practices. Exam glove box dispensers, sometimes referred to as PPE dispensers, eliminate the need to carry exam gloves in pockets, loose in drawers or on countertops. There are several factors to consider when selecting the right exam glove box dispenser. The type of facility and the amount of traffic your facility or department receives are two of the top considerations. The application and location of the dispenser will determine what size capacity is needed, the type of material, mounting orientation and any additional features.

Application

In high traffic locations such as emergency departments, operating rooms and trauma units where exam glove usage is critical, keeping a safe stocking level is crucial to staying compliant with infection control policies.  Selecting a quad or four box exam glove dispenser ensures that your department will always have sufficient inventory on hand at all times. Hospitals with a large number of staff will typically want to choose a quad or triple box exam glove dispenser that can accommodate multiple sizes.  For more specialized infection control applications, the Microban Anti-Microbial exam glove box holder is ideal for use in cleanrooms, hospitals, and microbiological work areas.

Capacity

There are four common exam glove box dispenser configurations: single, double, triple, and quad to meet your facilities needs. Some of the dispensers are designed to be dedicated exam glove box holders while other dispensers, like the FlexHold quad glove/mask holder have been designed to hold various types of PPE supply boxes. There are also specialty exam glove dispenser boxes that incorporate an additional pocket to hold hand sanitizer.

Material

Exam glove box dispensers are available in multiple substrates: acrylic, powder coated steel wire, epoxy coated steel wire, stainless steel, white steel, and high-impact polystyrene. Acrylic dispensers are clear and durable allowing for quick glove identification and easy refilling. The powder coated and epoxy coated wire dispensers feature a see-through construction which allows for easy identification of glove sizes. The durable stainless steel dispensers are long lasting and safe to clean with most bleach solutions. The powder coated steel dispensers offer a durable finish and an open design which allows for easy identification of glove sizes. Dispensers constructed from high impact polystyrene (HIPS) are durable and are resistant to harsh cleaning solutions.

Mounting Orientation

Exam glove box dispensers are available in multiple mounting configurations. Some dispensers are designed with two-way keyholes that allow for a dual mounting option so that the dispenser can be mounted vertically or horizontally. Dispensers may also come with suction cups that allow for mounting on glass surfaces. In addition to the wall mount option, many of the dispensers can also be placed on a counter or tabletop which will keep glove boxes organized and improve the utilization of exam gloves in your facility.

Features 

Unique features may be necessary depending on the specific location and application. Let’s take a look at some of the unique features available. There are Dispensers with locking lids which offer an added level of protection for safely and securely storing exam gloves while still allowing for easy access. Most acrylic dispensers have finger holes located on one end to make refilling quick and easy. There are several types of loading configurations including, top, side, and bottom loading. Some dispensers have spring loaded back flaps that keeps glove boxes up front and firmly in place, preventing smaller boxes from sliding. The FlexHold quad glove/mask holder has a unique bottom loading, adjustable clamp design that adjusts to a variety of different sized PPE boxes including, gloves, mop caps, ear defenders, face masks, and shoe covers.

There are a variety of exam glove dispensers to choose from and that is why it is important to take the criteria listed above into consideration before making your decision. Purchasing exam glove dispensers might seem like a fairly straightforward process but with the amount of options available it can make the decision more difficult then originally anticipated. If you may have any questions regarding how to choose the right exam glove please feel free to leave a comment below or contact us directly at info@universalmedicalinc.com.