What is FluoroSafety?

Identifying Important Risks Associated with FGI

In 1994 the FDA released a public health advisory warning of the potential for serious radiation-induced skin injuries to patients resulting from fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI).  In the 20 years since this advisory, there have been hundreds of published cases of skin injury resulting from FGI, and the number is steadily increasing even today.  As the scope of disease that can be diagnosed and treated using FGI increases, so does the complexity of these procedures and the radiation doses to patients, physicians, and staff.  While these procedures provide an incredible benefit to the patient compared to open-surgical alternatives, there are important risks that must be understood by the performing physician.

The Need for Effective Training

In 2010, frustrated by the lack of user-friendly, accessible, and effective training focused on this topic, two diagnostic medical physicists started Fluoroscopic Safety, LLC [http://www.fluorosafety.com]. Understanding the need for a balanced perspective and considering that radiation is not the only risk from FGI, they collaborated with an experienced board certified interventional radiologist well-known for his work in quality improvement.  Because of the multi-disciplinary M.D. and Ph.D. backgrounds of the authors of FluoroSafety courses, we understand that when a physician is performing an FGI, managing radiation dose is not the first thing on his mind.  Instead, practitioners are thinking about the patient-specific technical challenges associated with these procedures.  The training programs from FluoroSafety are developed with this in mind.  While our courses do provide instruction on the fundamental physics of fluoroscopy and radiation biology, we focus on simple methods for managing patient and staff radiation dose.  Using videos and animations, our courses provide an easy to remember and easy to execute set of practices which benefit both the physician and their patients.  This is one of the key features of our courses, designed by physicians and physicists together.

Fluoro CME Training and Education

The educational programs from FluoroSafety also help providers satisfy state regulatory requirements. Through a joint sponsorship with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, our courses have been approved for up to 10.5 hours of AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.   Our programs meet the training requirements for practitioners who use fluoroscopy in Oregon, California, and Texas.  In addition, board certified providers who complete these courses are eligible to claim self assessment CME (SA-CME), as required for Maintenance of Certification (MOC) by members of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS).

Interactive and Engaging Content

The educational programs from FluoroSafety are tailored to the needs of busy healthcare professionals and feature on-demand Flash-based learning rich in animations and videos.  Our courses also feature optional narration.  Course content can be accessed at the convenience of the physician from any computer, smartphone, or tablet with Internet access.

Meet State Requirements

Whether you are trying to meet state regulatory requirements or are simply interested in improving the care you provide to your patients, FluoroSafety has a course for you.  The most common feedback we have received from physicians who have taken our course is that they were surprised by how much they didn’t know about the safe use of fluoroscopy—you may be surprised too!

FluoroSafety.com

A. Kyle Jones, PhD

Alexander S. Pasciak, PhD

Joseph Steele, MD

Fluoroscopic Safety, LLC

Discover Gucci Radiation Resistant Glasses

Are you fashion savvy?

Have you been searching for a fashionable way to protect your eyes from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation?

Then look no further.

Gucci radiation resistant glasses have arrived. Gucci, a name synonymous with high-fashion and stylish sophistication is the latest addition to our radiation protection eyewear line.

Gucci’s styles for women range from the lightweight nylon frames of the Gucci GG 3547/S, to the bold, full-rimmed frame of the Gucci GG 3574/S.

For men, available styles include the classic Gucci GG1000/S full-rimmed acetate frame and the GG 1856/S ultra-sleek wrap frame.

Radiation resistant glasses never looked so good.

Women’s Radiation Resistant Glasses

Gucci GG 3547/S

The Gucci GG 3547/S (shown above) frames are made of lightweight, durable blended nylon for added comfort and flexibility. Unlike the brittle nylon eyeglass frames of the late 1940s, blended nylon frames are more resistant to breakage and are inherently stronger than their predecessor. Consequently, blended nylon frames are ideal for those looking for a high-quality, durable, and resilient frame.

The round shape of these frames subtly draws attention to the eyes and are well-suited for those with diamond-shaped faces. The ‘simultaneous contrast’ of the red and green temples, juxtaposing complementary colors, creates a stunning visual effect. The decorative, high-set temples are emblazoned with the iconic Gucci label (white lettering) on a bold red background. For those who have been seeking a distinctive and sophisticated pair of radiation resistant glasses, your journey finally may be nearing its end.

 

Gucci GG 3574/S

The epitome of Italian luxury, the Gucci GG 3574/S rectangular frame is bold and distinctive. The hypoallergenic black optyl frame is specially coated to resist sweat and cosmetics. These Gucci radiation resistant glasses seamlessly blend fashion, elegance, and sophistication into an integral piece of personal radiation protective equipment. A trendy frame for those who are unwilling to sacrifice style but understand the importance of properly protecting their eyes from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation.

Have you been searching for radiation eye protection that is functional, yet fashionable?

Your search is over.

These Gucci radiation resistant frames are the answer.

Offering the industry standard 0.75mm lead equivalency, the SCHOTT radiation resistant safety glass lenses will protect your eyes from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation.

According to the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency), “Many years or decades could pass before radiation-induced eye lens injuries become apparent. At relatively high exposures of a few Gy* , lens opacities may occur after many years¹.”

Ensure that your eyes are properly protected by wearing the appropriate radiation resistant glasses. In a 2010 study, Comparing Strategies For Operator Eye Protection In The Interventional Radiography Suite, “The use of leaded glasses alone reduced the lens dose rate by a factor of 5 to 10.” Reduce your risk of developing cataracts, while staying fashionable and safe with Gucci radiation resistant glasses.

Sources:

Thornton RH, Dauer LT, Altamirano JP, Alvardo KJ, St Germain J, Solomon SB. (2010) Comparing Strategies For Operator Eye Protection In The Interventional Radiography Suite.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20920841

IAEA | Radiation Protection of Patients (RPOP) Radiation and cataract: Staff protection

http://rpop.iaea.org/RPOP/RPoP/Content/InformationFor/HealthProfessionals/6_OtherClinicalSpecialities/radiation-cataract/Radiation-and_cataract.htm

Gray (Unit)

Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gray_(unit)

*Gy = Gray, is a derived unit of ionizing radiation dose in the International System of Units (SI). It is a measure of the absorbed dose and is defined and is defined as the absorption of one joule of radiation energy by one kilogram of matter (0.01 Gy is equivalent to 1 rad).

Whiteboard Wednesday: Surgeon Cooling Systems

How Do Surgeons Stay Cool In The Operating Room?

Today on Whiteboard Wednesday we talk about how surgeons stay cool in the operating room. A major concern for medical staff working in the OR is fatigue caused by overheating.  Overheating is caused by the multiple layers surgeons and staff must wear for protection. During certain procedures the surgeon’s body heat is intensified, the CoolVest can help keep the surgeon more comfortable and alert.

What Is A Surgeon Cooling System?

The CoolVest System is a unique and innovative personal cooling system that is designed to keep surgeons cool and focused while performing surgery. The Single-Surgeon CoolVest System allows you to regulate your personal comfort so that you won’t perspire, suffer fatigue or lose concentration. The surgeon cooling system includes a lightweight vest that is constructed of hospital-grade ventilated nylon for maximum cooling, a variable flow control with quick-dry disconnect, wheeled cart with handle for convenient portability, and a UL listed cooler with variable flow 110V pump.

How Does The Surgeon Cooling System Work?  

The CoolVest is worn over scrubs and under surgical gowns. The tubing connection is located at the lower back of the garment to help keep the water supply tubing from interfering with the sterile field. Cooling tubes are located in the front and back of the garment for maximum cooling. The patented, thin-walled, non-kink tubing has been specifically designed for use under lead aprons.

Setup

  1. To begin, the cooling unit is filled with a mixture of approximately one gallon of water and ice (preferably block ice) or cube ice to the top of the unit.
  2. After the unit has been properly filled, you will want to attach the 8 foot insulated supply hose (quick disconnect) to the CoolVest.
  3. Apply the protective hose cover and then attach the other end of the insulated supply hose to the cooling unit.
  4. Listen for an audible click from both quick disconnect hose connections to ensure that they are properly connected.

Operation

  1. Once the supply hose has been properly protected and connected, you will want to plug the cooling unit’s electrical adapter into a grounded 110V outlet.
  2. Turn the unit on using the green On/Off power switch.
  3. Allow the unit to cycle until L.E.D indicator on Speed Control is activated (30 second pump start delay).
  4. Press “Ice Cube” on the Speed Control display on the lid of the system to start unit at desired level. L.E.D. on display will light from left to right for increased water flow. (e.g. 20-40-60-80-100% levels)
  5. To increase flow rate, press the “Ice Cube” button again, as needed, to adjust to the desired flow rate.
  6. To reset Speed Control setting: press “Ice Cube” until the surgeon cooling system stops; restart by pressing “Ice Cube” again until correct setting is indicated.

Relief From Heat While Performing Surgery

Surgeons have been impacted by excessive heat surrounding their bodies due to stress and other environmental factors. For example, neurosurgeons are required to wear appropriate radiation protective shielding (lead aprons, thyroid collars, lead glasses) while using imaging technology to protect them from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The use of these protective garments in addition to scrubs and surgical gowns can significantly increase the surgeon’s body temperature during surgical procedures. The increase in temperature can result in the surgeon becoming fatigued and perspiring during long surgeries which can reduce their focus and attention, resulting in a decrease in their ability to perform their tasks at the desired level.

Share Your Experiences

Have you experienced an increase in your body temperature while performing complicated surgeries? Interested in learning more? Make sure to check out our post on the Active Cooling Vest System For Surgeons In The OR!

Active Cooling Vest System For Surgeons In The OR

What is an active cooling vest? 

A cooling vest is a piece of equipment designed to cool a person down. Cooling vests are used by doctors, athletes, industrial workers, working dogs, individuals with Multiple Sclerosis or hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, race care drivers, and military personnel.

Active cooling vests and systems require some form of power, electricity or battery, to operate. This type of cooling technology provides continuous cooling to lower the body’s core temperature by circulating cold water via a cooler through a tube to the vest.

CoolVest System 

Although cooling vests are used by a variety of people for a variety of uses, the CoolVest System has been designed specifically for surgeons working in the OR. Staying cool in the OR is an important consideration for surgeons, especially when performing pediatric surgeries, burn or trauma cases. The CoolVest System will keep you cool and focused – even when the OR has been warmed to AORN (recommended OR temperature 68-73 Fahrenheit) and Joint Commission Standards. When performing surgical procedures where the surgeon is exerting a great deal of physical effort, body temperatures can easily rise while covered with sterile gowns and lead aprons, not to mention the heat emitted from the OR lights.

CoolVest System Features

  • Lightweight vest made with hospital-grade ventilated nylon for maximum comfort.
  • Variable flow control and quick-dry disconnects for ease-of-use.
  • Choice of styles & sizes from small – XXXL
  • Variable hose lengths for freedom of motion.
  • Up to 70 feet of patented, thin wall, no-kink tubing for use under lead aprons.
  • Low-profile cooling unit for easy storage.
  • Wheeled cart with handle for convenient portability.
  • Single and dual vest capacity.
  • Heavy duty pump system.
  • Limited Lifetime Warranty with Free Loaner Program
  • UL Listing guarantees the highest quality standards for use in the OR.

Single-Surgeon System Includes

  • One premium CoolVest (Small-XXXL)
  • 8 foot insulated supply hose with quick disconnects
  • Protective hose cover
  • T-Drain kit
  • Maintenance additive (16 ounce bottle)
  • Stainless steel cart with hospital grade wheels
  • UL Listed cooler with variable flow 110V pump

A Dual-Surgeon System is also available and comes with two premium CoolVests. 

Remain Alert And Focused

The CoolVest System offers variable flow control, which allows you to regulate the fluid flow to your personal comfort level so that you won’t perspire, suffer fatigue or lose concentration. No matter how long or complex the surgery, you’ll remain alert an focused.

Stay Cool And Comfortable

The lightweight vest is made with hospital-grade ventilated nylon for maximum comfort. Available in sizes ranging from small to XXXL the CoolVest is lightweight, comfortable, and durable for OR conditions. Comfort is essential when working under intense pressure and performing hundreds of high-risk procedures each year. The CoolVest will help surgeons and medical staff stay cool and focused while working in the OR. Make sure to visit our Surgeon Cooling section on our main site for more CoolVest products.

3 Rugged Oakley Radiation Eye Protection Lead Glasses

New Lead Glasses From Oakley

We are excited to announce the addition of a new line of high-quality and durable radiation eye protection lead glasses from Oakley. There are three models available including the classic Oakley Straight Jacket, the Oakley Crankshaft, and the Oakley Fives Squared. These new frames are a welcomed addition to our extensive selection of radiation eye protection and that provides our customers with a stylish and unique answer to traditional radiation eye protection.

 Straight Jacket® Lead Glasses

The aggressive styling combined with over a decade worth of research has produced the Oakley Straight Jacket radiation glasses. These lightweight and durable stress resistant Straight Jacket frames utilize Oakley’s O-Matter® frame technology and are engineered to provide you with all-day comfort and performance.

Part of the Oakley active line, and available in a variety of colors, these frames offer protection that meets ANSI standards for both high-velocity and high-mass impact.

Designed to fit medium faces, the Straight Jacket frame utilizes soft Unobtanium components to increase grip with perspiration around the nose and ears, ensuring a snug fit.

For those that define style on their terms, the Oakley Straight Jacket Radiation Protection Lead Glasses provide you with unmatched comfort, performance and eye protection from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation.

Crankshaft™ Lead Glasses

Fusing radiation protection with the inspired smooth styling of the popular Oakley Gascan® and Fuel Cell™ designs comes the ultimate in radiation eye protection, introducing the revolutionary Crankshaft Radiation Glasses.

The lightweight and durable stress-resistant Crankshaft frames, available in a variety of colors, utilize Oakley O-Matter frame technology providing you with all-day comfort and performance.

Part of the Oakley Lifestyle line, these wraparound frames improve side protection and are designed to comfortably fit medium to large faces.

Achieve a new level of performance and style while protecting your eyes from radiation with the innovative Crankshaft Radiation Glasses.

Fives Squared Radiation Protection Lead Glasses

Faces are not one size fits all, your radiation glasses are no exception. Introducing the Fives Squared Radiation Protection Glasses, specifically designed for small to medium faces, that feel as great as they look.

Constructed of Oakley’s lightweight and durable stress-resistant O-Matter material, this frame is engineered to provide you all-day comfort and performance by utilizing Oakleys unique condensed cranial geometry.

The patented hydrophilic Unobtainum nose pads reduce slipping by increasing grip with perspiration, providing you with a snug and secure fit.

The dimensional reliefs, metal icons and sculpturally integrated hinges with dual action cams, the Fives Squared frame is the perfect blend of sophisticated styling and performance eye protection.

When ordinary radiation protection glasses just don’t fit, look no further, the Fives Squared Radiation Glasses is your answer to comfort and protection.

Lead Glass Lenses 

All three of the frames are outfitted with SCHOTT Radiation Safety Glass Lenses that provide the industry standard 0.75 millimeter lead equivalency and are held securely in place by Oakley’s unique Three-Point Fit technology, ensuring safety and long lasting performance.

Frame Personalization 

You can leave your mark by adding the option of a personalized imprinting of up to 35 characters on the outside of the frame arm and enhance the performance of the lead glass lenses with the optional fog-free or anti-reflective coatings. These customizations and enhancements are available for all three frames.

This is an exciting addition to our radiation eye protection line-up and if you would like to be notified of any future radiation eye protection glasses subscribe to our blog and we will notify you of upcoming product releases.

5 Ways To Minimize Your Occupational Radiation Exposure

Minimizing Occupational Exposure

“The ideal dose is the least amount of radiation possible to produce an acceptable image.”

1. Time

Time is one of the three basic safety measures to reduce external radiation exposure. It is important for healthcare personnel to limit the amount of time spent in close proximity to the radiation source when exposure to the radiation source is possible. Reducing the time of an exposure reduces the effective dose (radiation) proportionally. Consequently, the less time you are around the equipment, the smaller your exposure will be.

2. Notification by Radiation Equipment Operator

Before any treatment or procedure, it is the responsibility of the trained and certified radiation equipment operator to notify healthcare personnel in the x-ray or treatment room prior to the activation of radiation producing equipment (RPE).

Any piece of equipment in which x-rays are produced electrically are classified as radiation producing equipment or RPE. These tools are used in a variety of medical applications including radiography, mammography, computed tomography, and fluoroscopy.

3. Fluoroscopic Procedures

Healthcare personnel performing fluoroscopic procedures must ensure that the patient is kept as close as possible to the image intensifier side of the fluoroscopic unit and away from the tube side of the unit. All healthcare personnel involved in the fluoroscopic procedure must stand on the image intensifier side of the fluoroscopic unit, whenever possible, to reduce the radiation exposure. Standing on the the same side as the image intensifier radiation intensity is decreased.

4. Avoid Direct Beam Exposure

Healthcare personnel assisting with radiological procedures must avoid holding the patient manually during a radiographic study due to the risk of direct beam exposure.  Any individual holding or supporting a person during radiation exposure should wear protective gloves and apron with a minimum of 0.25 millimeters lead equivalent. Under no circumstances should individuals holding or supporting a person’s part of their body be directly in the primary beam. Healthcare personnel must avoid exposing any body parts to direct x-ray beam exposure.

5. Utilize Shielding

Whenever possible, appropriate shielding should be used to provide attenuation of the radiation being delivered to the healthcare personnel who are potentially exposed. Healthcare personnel must keep all body parts out of the direct x-ray beam. There are a variety of shielding options available and may include, but are not limited to:

Specific Shielding Applications

Healthcare personnel who may have to stand with their backs exposed to the radiation beam must wear wrap-around aprons to decrease the risk of radiation exposure.

Bone and Bone Marrow Protection

When healthcare personnel are in close proximity to the radiation beam they should wear an appropriate lead or lead equivalent apron of sufficient length to shield the upper legs and protect the long bones and bone marrow from increased doses of radiation.

Thyroid Protection 

Healthcare personnel must wear a thyroid collar to protect the thyroid whenever the likelihood of the procedure places them at a higher risk of increased exposure.

Female Healthcare Personnel 

Female healthcare personnel must protect their breasts from radiation exposure by utilizing an apron that completely covers the area.

Eye protection

Healthcare personnel must shield the lens of the eye by using leaded eyeglasses with wrap-around side shields or leaded face shields to reduce scatter radiation when it is anticipated that increased fluoroscopic time may be necessary.

Limiting Radiation Exposure 

Reducing radiological exposure in healthcare settings is important for both occupational workers as well as patients. The following guidelines are based on the radiation safety principles of time, distance, and shielding. By following these guidelines, you can reduce your occupational exposure to radiation.

 

 

 

Note: This information included in this post is intended for general reference information only. The information provided is not a substitute for professional advice and should not be relied upon in the absence of such professional advice.

3 Different Types of Radiation Shielding Materials (Part 1)

What are the different types of radiation shielding materials?

Radiation shielding materials are used for a variety of radiologic applications. “The use of radiation in diagnosing and treating patients has significantly advanced the field of medicine and saved or extended countless lives¹.” Advances in technology and more sophisticated applications have improved standard treatments for the benefit of the patient. Radiation use does, however, come with risks. “Those who use radiation must be adequately trained in radiation safety, radiation physics, the biologic effects of radiation, and injury prevention to ensure patient safety¹.” One of the three major principles of mitigating external radiation exposure is shielding, “Using absorber material such as Plexiglas for beta particles and lead for X-rays and gamma rays is an effective way to reduce radiation exposure².”

Radiation Shielding Materials

Historically, radiation shielding materials have been manufactured from lead (Pb). Lead shielding, often used in a variety of applications including diagnostic imaging, radiation therapy, nuclear and industrial shielding. For the purpose of this post, we will focus on the three different types of materials used in manufacturing x-ray attenuating garments such as aprons, vests, and skirts.

Radiation Shielding Materials

Radiation shielding garments are commonly used to protect medical patients and workers from direct and secondary radiation during diagnostic imaging in hospitals, clinics and dental offices³. Historically, the attenuating qualities of lead made it “the element of choice” for radiation protection. However, advances in radiation shielding material technology have produced two alternative materials, lead composite and lead-free radiation shielding. Now medical professionals have several options when it comes to selecting their radiation shielding garments.

Traditional Lead (Pb) Shielding

Lead is a chemical element in the carbon group with the symbol Pb and atomic number 82. Lead is a soft, malleable and corrosion-resistant material³. The high density of lead (11.34 grams per cm³) makes it a useful shield against X-ray and gamma-ray radiation. Lead, in its pure form, is brittle and cannot be worn as apparel. To transform pure lead into a wearable radiation shielding material it’s mixed with binders and additives to make a flexible lead vinyl sheet. The lead sheets are then layered to the desired thickness to achieve the required lead equivalency and incorporated into the radiation shielding garment. There are typically three standard levels of lead equivalency protection for traditional lead radiation shielding garments including 0.25mm, 0.35mm and 0.5mm.

Lead (Pb) Composite Shielding

Lead composite shielding is a mixture of lead and other lighter weight metals. These lead-based composite blends are a proprietary mixture of lead and other heavy metals that attenuate radiation. The lead composite blend will vary by manufacturer as they have developed their own proprietary blends that may include a mixture of lead, tin, rubber, PVC vinyl and other proprietary attenuating metals. The lead-based composite blend radiation shielding garments are lighter (up to 25%) than regular grade lead and are available with the same lead equivalency protection levels.

Non-Lead (Pb) and Lead (Pb) Free Shielding

Similar to the proprietary blends of lead-based composite shielding materials the non-lead and lead-free shielding materials offer the same protection levels. Non-lead shielding materials are manufactured with additives and binders mixed with attenuating heavy metals that fall into the same category of materials as lead that also absorb or block radiation. These metals may include tin (Sn), antimony (Sb), tungsten (W) bismuth (Bi) or other elements. Non-lead aprons and lead-free aprons are recyclable and safe for non-hazardous disposal. The material blends are propriety to the specific manufacturer; therefore; the materials mentioned above are not representative of any specific manufacturer.

Benefits of Shielding Options

The three core material options discussed all have their own unique benefits and features. There are several factors you will want to consider when making your decision, including the specific procedure being performed, length of the procedure, and frequency of the procedure. To determine the proper amount of protection required in your working environment contact your radiation safety officer or radiation physicist. Selecting the right radiation shielding garment begins by identifying the core material option right for you.

(Part 2)  How to determine which x-ray apron material is right for you

In our next post, we will discuss how to determine which x-ray apron material is right for you. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us.

What Are The Parts Of A Lead Eyeglass Frame?

Why are lead eyeglasses important? The risk for radiation induced eye injuries are particularly high for health professionals such as interventional cardiologists, interventional radiologists, doctors using fluoroscopy in operating theaters and paramedical personnel who remain close to the patient during the procedure.  These individuals may be within the high-scatter X-ray radiation field for several hours a day during procedures.

It is important to protect your eyes from potential radiation exposure and reduce the risk of eye injuries. When selecting a pair of lead eyeglasses it is important to understand the various parts of the lead glasses. Once you have purchased your lead eyeglasses you may be wearing them for the majority of your workday so you will want to ensure that you find the most comfortable style frame possible. Below are common terms used to describe the different parts and sections of the lead eyeglasses.

Frame Front: The frame front is the section of the lead eyeglass that holds the lenses in place and bridges the top of the nose.

Eye Wire/Rim: The eye wire or eye rim is the part of the frame front where the lead lenses are inserted.

Bridge: The section between the lenses that sit above the nose is referred to as the bridge. There are several types of bridges listed below in more detail.

  • Keyhole bridge: Shaped like an old-fashioned keyhole and rests on the upper sides of the nose, this style is perfect for individuals with small or flat nose bridges.
  • Saddle bridge: Shaped like a saddle and evenly distributes the weight of the lead eyeglasses across the sides and top of the nose, works well for heavy lead glasses and those who are sensitive to pressure.
  • Adjustable bridge: Nose pads are designed to be adjusted for fit and comfort.
  • Double bridge: The double bridge has a second reinforcing bar that goes over the top of the bridge.

Hinges: The part of the frame that connects the frame front to the temples and allows the temples to swing.

Lead Side Shields: Shields offer additional protection and are made from removable lead equivalent plastic.

Lead Lenses: Lenses are made from 0.75mm lead equivalent (medical industry standard) that provide radiation protection for the eyes. Available in prescription and non-prescription lenses.

Temples

  • Skull temples: The most popular for plastic frames, they are bent down slightly over the ear and follow the contour of the skull.
  • Spring-hinged temples: Some frames come with a spring-hinge for added comfort and increased protection from breaking.
  • Library or paddle temples: This particular temple style is straight and is designed so that they can be slipped on an off easily.

 End Pieces: The extensions of the frame front where the temples are attached.

Nose Pads: The nose pads are made from a soft material like rubber or plastic to help keep the frame in the proper place. They can be attached directly to the glasses or to the pad arms.

Pad Arms: The pad arms are attachments that hold the nose pad in place and allow for adjustment to the bridge.

Top Bar: Frequently found in aviator style glasses, this reinforcement bar crosses the top of the lead eyeglasses on some metal frames.

Temple Tips/Ear Piece: Generally a plastic coating used to cover the ends of the temples behind or over the ears.

Rimless Frames: Rimless frames or mountings attach the temples and bridge directly to the lenses without the use of eye-wires or rims.

Selecting the right pair of lead eyeglasses is important and we are here to help you along the way. We recommend consulting with your radiation safety officer for more local standards and  information for your facility. Remember, whether your staff is working around radiation every day or once a month, it is crucial to keep their eyes protected from harmful radiation exposure! If you have any questions please feel free to contact us directly via email or live chat. We are always looking to assist our customers by providing them more knowledge to ensure they make the right choice, if you have a particular question that you feel would make a good addition to our blog, please leave a comment below.

How To Choose The Right Exam Glove Dispenser

Choosing the right exam glove box dispenser is an important step in keeping your medical facility organized and promoting sound infection control practices. Exam glove box dispensers, sometimes referred to as PPE dispensers, eliminate the need to carry exam gloves in pockets, loose in drawers or on countertops. There are several factors to consider when selecting the right exam glove box dispenser. The type of facility and the amount of traffic your facility or department receives are two of the top considerations. The application and location of the dispenser will determine what size capacity is needed, the type of material, mounting orientation and any additional features.

Application

In high traffic locations such as emergency departments, operating rooms and trauma units where exam glove usage is critical, keeping a safe stocking level is crucial to staying compliant with infection control policies.  Selecting a quad or four box exam glove dispenser ensures that your department will always have sufficient inventory on hand at all times. Hospitals with a large number of staff will typically want to choose a quad or triple box exam glove dispenser that can accommodate multiple sizes.  For more specialized infection control applications, the Microban Anti-Microbial exam glove box holder is ideal for use in cleanrooms, hospitals, and microbiological work areas.

Capacity

There are four common exam glove box dispenser configurations: single, double, triple, and quad to meet your facilities needs. Some of the dispensers are designed to be dedicated exam glove box holders while other dispensers, like the FlexHold quad glove/mask holder have been designed to hold various types of PPE supply boxes. There are also specialty exam glove dispenser boxes that incorporate an additional pocket to hold hand sanitizer.

Material

Exam glove box dispensers are available in multiple substrates: acrylic, powder coated steel wire, epoxy coated steel wire, stainless steel, white steel, and high-impact polystyrene. Acrylic dispensers are clear and durable allowing for quick glove identification and easy refilling. The powder coated and epoxy coated wire dispensers feature a see-through construction which allows for easy identification of glove sizes. The durable stainless steel dispensers are long lasting and safe to clean with most bleach solutions. The powder coated steel dispensers offer a durable finish and an open design which allows for easy identification of glove sizes. Dispensers constructed from high impact polystyrene (HIPS) are durable and are resistant to harsh cleaning solutions.

Mounting Orientation

Exam glove box dispensers are available in multiple mounting configurations. Some dispensers are designed with two-way keyholes that allow for a dual mounting option so that the dispenser can be mounted vertically or horizontally. Dispensers may also come with suction cups that allow for mounting on glass surfaces. In addition to the wall mount option, many of the dispensers can also be placed on a counter or tabletop which will keep glove boxes organized and improve the utilization of exam gloves in your facility.

Features 

Unique features may be necessary depending on the specific location and application. Let’s take a look at some of the unique features available. There are Dispensers with locking lids which offer an added level of protection for safely and securely storing exam gloves while still allowing for easy access. Most acrylic dispensers have finger holes located on one end to make refilling quick and easy. There are several types of loading configurations including, top, side, and bottom loading. Some dispensers have spring loaded back flaps that keeps glove boxes up front and firmly in place, preventing smaller boxes from sliding. The FlexHold quad glove/mask holder has a unique bottom loading, adjustable clamp design that adjusts to a variety of different sized PPE boxes including, gloves, mop caps, ear defenders, face masks, and shoe covers.

There are a variety of exam glove dispensers to choose from and that is why it is important to take the criteria listed above into consideration before making your decision. Purchasing exam glove dispensers might seem like a fairly straightforward process but with the amount of options available it can make the decision more difficult then originally anticipated. If you may have any questions regarding how to choose the right exam glove please feel free to leave a comment below or contact us directly at info@universalmedicalinc.com.

PPE Use In Healthcare Settings

PPE or personal protective equipment is defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) as “specialized clothing or equipment worn by an employee for protection against infectious materials”. OSHA regulations require the use of PPE in healthcare settings to protect healthcare personnel from exposure to bloodborne pathogens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Under OSHA guidelines, employers must provide their employees with the appropriate PPE while ensuring that PPE is properly disposed of if disposable, cleaned or laundered, repaired and stored after each use.

Protecting healthcare personnel from infectious disease exposures in the workplace requires a combination of controls. The use of PPE is one of four key components in the hierarchy of healthcare worker safety programs.

  • Training (e.g. policies and procedures)
  • Engineering Controls (e.g. negative pressure rooms)
  • Work Practice Controls (e.g. not recapping needles)
  • Personal Protective Equipment

Although PPE is listed last in the hierarchy of prevention, it is extremely important for protecting healthcare workers from disease transmission. Listed below is a sampling of some commonly found types of PPE found in healthcare settings.

  • Gloves (protect hands)
  • Gowns/aprons (protect skin and clothing)
  • Masks (protect mouth/nose)
  • Respirators (protect respiratory tract from airborne infectious agents)
  • Goggles/glasses (protect eyes)
  • Face shields (protect face, mouth, nose and eyes)
  • Shoe covers (protects from airborne infectious agents)
  • Head covers/bonnets  (protects from airborne infectious agents)

The type of PPE used will vary based on the level of precautions required;  standard and contact, droplet or airborne infection isolation. When selecting PPE it is important to consider three things; type of exposure anticipated, durability and appropriateness for the task, and fit. Remember to always use safe work practices to protect yourself and limit the spread of contamination. Polices may vary by facility, please check with the appropriate department director in your facility for more information.