Archives for October 2013

How-To Choose The Right Human Skeleton Model

The Human Skeletal System

The human skeletal system, the internal skeleton serves as a framework for the body, is one of the most difficult body components to study and observe. Human skeleton models and diagrams are the primary teaching tools used to teach students and patients. When it comes to choosing the right human skeleton model it is important to familiarize yourself with the skeletal system.

The skeleton consists of bones, cartilage, joints, and ligaments. Humans are born with approximately 350 bones. As they grow, some bones fuse together over time to form a single bone. As a result, adults have 206 individual bones.

The Two Divisions of the Human Skeleton

The bones of a human skeleton can be categorized into two divisions. The first group, axial skeleton, are the 80 bones that form the central axis of the human body and consist of the skull, vertebral column, and bony thorax. The axial skeleton bones support and protect the organs of the head, neck and trunk, including the skull, sternum, ribs, and vertebrae.  The second group, appendicular skeleton, are the 126 bones that are related to our appendages, including the bones of the arms, hands, legs, feet, shoulder, and hip.

The location where two bones meet is called a joint. There are two types of joints in the human body; fixed joints and moving joints. The skull has 28 bones which are fused together with fixed joints. Moving joints allow for humans to twist and bend in different directions. There are two main types of moving joints, a hinge joint and a ball and socket joint. Ligaments are stretchy bands of tissue that hold together bones. In between the bones of a joint is a firm, rubbery tissue called cartilage. Cartilage acts as the body’s shock absorber.

Selecting the Right Human Skeleton Model

Now that we have covered the basics of the human skeletal system we can determine what type of human skeleton model will be right for your intended usage. The first step in selecting the right human skeleton model is identifying the criteria you will use to make your selection.  Listed below are the six main categories that will clearly identify which human skeleton model is right for you.

  • Basic Specifications; required assembly, display stand, gender, height, material, and numbered parts.
  • Skeleton Details; herniated/prolapsed disk in spine, muscle origins/insertions marked, nerve branches marked, realistic texture, imitation tendons/ligaments, and vertebral artery marked.
  • Flexible Parts; arms, fingers, jaw, joints, legs, and spine.
  • Removable Parts; arms, calvarium (skull cap), feet, hands, legs, and teeth.
  • Education Materials; bone guide, general anatomy information, and detailed bone information.
  • Intended Uses; primary school, secondary school, doctor’s office, and physical therapy.

After evaluating the different skeleton models against the criteria listed above you should have a clear understanding of the main differences between the available models. There are a wide-range of models available from the small budget skeleton models like Flexible Mr. Thrifty to the deluxe natural sized, highly detailed skeleton model cast from actual bone to meet your needs. If you have any additional questions regarding how to choose the right human skeleton model contact us or leave a comment below.

 

 

Whiteboard Wednesday: Patient Protection

It’s Whiteboard Wednesday! Sticking with our infection control theme, today Faye talks about the importance of patient protection supplies, watch here:

Why Wearing A Face Mask Is Important

Hospital and medical center staff wear face masks to prevent the spread of disease. This post will highlight why wearing a face mask is so important and how to wear a face mask in your medical setting.

Why wear a face mask?

Wearing a face mask will help prevent the spread of infection and prevent the individual from contracting any airborne infectious germs. When someone coughs, talks, sneezes they could release germs into the air that may infect others nearby. Face masks are part of an infection control strategy to eliminate cross-contamination.

How should your face mask be worn?

  1. Always wash your hands with soap and water before touching the face mask.
  2. Remove mask from the dispenser or box and make sure the masks do not have any holes or tears.
  3. Make sure you determine which side is the top and which is the front of the mask, so you can properly wear the mask.
  4. Face masks with ear loops: hold by the ear loops and put the loops around each ear.
  5. Face masks with ties: bring mask to your nose and place the ties over your head to secure with a tie.
  6. Face masks with bands: hold mask to your nose and pull the top strap over the crown of your head and pull the bottom strap over your head so its at the nape of your neck.
  7. Pull the mask over your mouth and chin

Our CoolOne Ear Loop Masks with Magic Arch Support are hypoallergenic and fluid resistant, ideal for medical settings. The magic arch support holds the mask away from the nose and mouth and provides a cooler, more comfortable breathing chamber without obstruction of downward vision.

Do you wear face masks in a medical setting? Let us know below!

PPE Use In Healthcare Settings

PPE or personal protective equipment is defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) as “specialized clothing or equipment worn by an employee for protection against infectious materials”. OSHA regulations require the use of PPE in healthcare settings to protect healthcare personnel from exposure to bloodborne pathogens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Under OSHA guidelines, employers must provide their employees with the appropriate PPE while ensuring that PPE is properly disposed of if disposable, cleaned or laundered, repaired and stored after each use.

Protecting healthcare personnel from infectious disease exposures in the workplace requires a combination of controls. The use of PPE is one of four key components in the hierarchy of healthcare worker safety programs.

  • Training (e.g. policies and procedures)
  • Engineering Controls (e.g. negative pressure rooms)
  • Work Practice Controls (e.g. not recapping needles)
  • Personal Protective Equipment

Although PPE is listed last in the hierarchy of prevention, it is extremely important for protecting healthcare workers from disease transmission. Listed below is a sampling of some commonly found types of PPE found in healthcare settings.

  • Gloves (protect hands)
  • Gowns/aprons (protect skin and clothing)
  • Masks (protect mouth/nose)
  • Respirators (protect respiratory tract from airborne infectious agents)
  • Goggles/glasses (protect eyes)
  • Face shields (protect face, mouth, nose and eyes)
  • Shoe covers (protects from airborne infectious agents)
  • Head covers/bonnets  (protects from airborne infectious agents)

The type of PPE used will vary based on the level of precautions required;  standard and contact, droplet or airborne infection isolation. When selecting PPE it is important to consider three things; type of exposure anticipated, durability and appropriateness for the task, and fit. Remember to always use safe work practices to protect yourself and limit the spread of contamination. Polices may vary by facility, please check with the appropriate department director in your facility for more information.

Weekly Wrap For October 20-26, 2013

Infection Prevention: 10 Ways To Protect Your Patients From Infection

October 20-26 is International Infection Prevention Week! Protecting patients from infection is everyone’s responsibility. Join your healthcare colleagues in celebrating International Infection Prevention Week (IIPW) this week to help raise awareness of the importance of infection prevention.

National Health Education Week October 21-25

This week is an important week in the healthcare industry! We’re excited to announce National Health Education Week is October 21-25 this year.

How To Reduce The Risk Of Infections When Visiting Patients In The Hospital

Many people visit their family and friends in the hospital every day. They visit to show their support and to gain better knowledge of the patient’s condition. But it’s important to be aware of how to prevent spreading germs during hospital visits. 

Whiteboard Wednesday: PPE Supply Dispensers

In this week's Whiteboard Wednesday we discuss the benefits of using PPE (personal protective equipment) supply dispensers in your medical facility! 

Shielding: One Of The Key Principles Of Radiation Protection

Time, distance and shielding are the three basic concepts of radiation protection that apply to all types of ionizing radiation. Shielding simply means having something that will absorb radiation between the source of the radiation and the area to be protected. Radiation shielding is based on the principle of attenuation, which is the gradual loss in intensity of any energy through a medium.

How Infections In Hospitals Spread

How do infections in hospital settings spread? People.

People spread a majority of infections within a hospital. Who are these people? Patients, medical personnel and visitors are our top three sources.

How Infections In Hospitals Spread

How do infections in hospital settings spread? People.

People spread a majority of infections within a hospital. Who are these people? Patients, medical personnel and visitors are our top three sources. These groups can easily (and quickly) spread infection without even knowing it.

Patients
Patients are already sick and can possibly have infections or diseases already. They can spread infection by touching, coughing, sneezing, or leaving behind any bodily fluids for unprotected visitors or medical staff to pick up.

This is why many infection control standards include isolation precautions, which isolate patients from other patients or certain areas of the hospital.

Medical Staff
It’s very easy for medical staff to spread infection throughout hospitals. They are providing care for multiple patients in a single day and can carry germs from room to room.

That is why it’s important for medical staff to wear protective apparel, wash their hands and follow all infection control standards when it comes to cross-contamination.

Visitors
It’s also easy for visitors to spread infection, as sometimes they may visit with a small cold or worse – contagious illness or disease. This can spread infection to patients both directly and indirectly. It’s essential for hospital visitors to not visit when they’re sick. Sick visitors can negatively affect the health of patients.

Infection can spread through germs that are airborne, from direct contact or indirect contact. It doesn’t take long for infection to spread. It’s important to remember that hospital infections can range from minor colds to serious, life-threatening conditions. If you have questions or comments on how infection can spread through a hospital, please let us know below.

Whiteboard Wednesday: PPE Supply Dispensers

In today’s Whiteboard Wednesday we discuss the benefits of using PPE (personal protection equipment) supply dispensers in your medical facility! Watch below:

How To Reduce The Risk Of Infections When Visiting Patients In The Hospital

Many people visit their family and friends in the hospital every day. They visit to show their support and to gain better knowledge of the patient’s condition. But it’s important to be aware of how to prevent spreading germs during hospital visits. Patients in the hospital are already ill, so by exposing them to infectious germs it may add more complications and increase their hospital stay.

Washing your hands and staying home if you’re sick are most likely the best ways to prevent spread of germs. A few tips when visiting a patient in the hospital:

  • Wash your hands before and after visiting, after using the restroom, before and after touching a sick patient
  • Wash your hands and wrists and apply soap, scrub for at least 20 seconds and be sure to remove rings
  • Dry your hands with clean paper towel
  • You may also want to use hand sanitizers, which are usually found throughout any hospital
  • Do not sit on patient beds or touch their equipment
  • Stay home if you’re not feeling well – even if it’s just a small cold

Because a patient’s immune system is typically very weak during their stay in a hospital, it’s important to stop the spread of germs. If you’re not sure whether or not to visit someone in the hospital, we recommend speaking with a medical staff member of the hospital you plan on visiting. If you have any questions or comments, please let us know below.

Infection Prevention: 10 Ways To Protect Your Patients From Infection

October 20-26 is International Infection Prevention Week!

Protecting patients from infection is everyone’s responsibility. Join your healthcare colleagues in celebrating International Infection Prevention Week (IIPW) this week to help raise awareness of the importance of infection prevention. The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology  (APIC) initiated the formal commemoration of IIPW in 2006 and has been increasing awareness of infection prevention throughout the world.

APIC continues to lead the annual effort every third week in October to highlight the benefits of infection prevention. As awareness of IIPW continues to grow, more patients will benefit from safer healthcare practices and will reduce the threat of healthcare-associated infections. Although the focus of IIPW is only 7 days, infection prevention should become a daily commitment. APIC has created a helpful list providing healthcare professionals 10 ways to protect patients from infections. A one-page infographic has also been created by APIC illustrating the steps that patients can take to support infection prevention efforts in healthcare facilities and lower their risk of infections.

  1. Wash or clean your hands before and after you provide care to a patient.

  2. Use gloves the right way.

  3. Get your shots-including your annual flu shot-and make sure everyone in your family does too.

  4. Follow the rules of isolation for the patient’s protection.

  5. Follow safe injection practices-remember One needle, One syringe, Only one time.

  6. Make patient identification a priority: right drug, right time, right dose.

  7. Keep the patient’s room and equipment clean.

  8. Know when antibiotics are appropriate…and when they are NOT.

  9. What you wear matters! Make sure your attire does not become a source of infection.

  10. Know about the infection preventionist.

Please visit the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology website to discover more helpful resources that you can share with your colleagues, friends and family. As IIPW expands, more patients benefit from safer healthcare practices and reduced threat of healthcare-associated infections.

National Health Education Week October 21-25

This week is an important week in the healthcare industry! We’re excited to announce National Health Education Week is October 21-25 this year.

This week is sponsored by the Society of Public Health Education (SOPHE), who promotes healthy behaviors, healthy communities, and healthy environments. They have been organizing this week since 1995 and this year’s theme is “The Role of Health Education Specialists in Implementing the Affordable Care Act.”

Here is the schedule for SOPHE’s daily topics this week:

Monday, October 21 Communicating ACA’s Provisions for Improving Consumer Health & Wellness
Tuesday, October 22 Navigating the Health Insurance Enrollment Process
Wednesday, October 23 Working with Accountable Care Organizations (ACO) and Patient-Centered Medical Homes (PCMH)
Thursday, October 24 Promoting Worksite Wellness
Friday, October 25 Advocating for the Prevention and Public Health Fund

 

For more information, visit https://www.sophe.org/nhew.cfm and be sure to pass this information along to your co-workers, family and friends!